The Avalanches Say New Album is Coming “Definitely Soon”

Good news for Avalanches fans: the sample-loving Australian group is working on a follow-up to their last album Wildflower, and we won’t have to wait 16 years to hear it.

Speaking with Sydney’s FBI Radio, band member Robbie Chater shared that he and Tony Di Blasi have been spending the last few weeks writing since returning home from tour. “It’s flowing so quickly. I think getting Wildflower out of the way and following up Since I Left You feels like a weight’s been lifted,” he said. “The [new] music is really light, it’s some of the best stuff we’ve done.”

When asked as to when fans can expect to hear said new music, Chater replied, “We’ve got eight songs we’re playing to the label on Monday. Who knows when [they’ll be out]? Next year? It’s definitely soon.”

The as-yet-untitled album will be The Avalanches’ third, following last year’s Wildflower, which included singles “Subways” and “Frankie Sinatra.” They also recorded an Essential Mix last summer.

The Last Record: Yotto Gives Love To His Peers

Photo of Yotto courtesy of Miro Kalliol.

Yotto’s 2016 is looking up. The Finnish DJ and producer recently released “The Owls,” a deep groove that further defines his shimmery sound. According to the producer, he wrote the track in a hotel in India during his numerous travels. “For me the track represents a more held back tension which is then released in the end with all the synth work coming together,” he said. Since it’s release, the track was chosen as an “Essential New Tune” from Pete Tong and the “Hottest Record in the World” from Annie Mac.

The producer has two more Twin Peaks-inspired releases scheduled before the end of the summer and featuring his distinct blend of the dark and light in his instrumentation. For this edition of “The Last Record,” Yotto chose a handful of selections including the latest from The Avalanches and other recent releases from his producing peers.

Wildflower by The Avalanches

Probably the most hyped album of the summer, but for a good reason. I almost cried a bit when I played this through. It’s such a great piece of cut and paste art that instantly took me back to the days of having Since I Left You on repeat. The whole album is a treasure chest of well known and super obscure samples. Ultimate summer record of 2016, and on the subject of buying records it reminded me of shuffling through endless piles of records as a kid. Nostalgia punch in the nose.

“Energy Flow” by Mano Le Tough (DJ Koze remix)

Been loving the original from Mano Le Tough’s great album for a while now. It’s been one of my favourite records to listen to on flights. This fits that purpose too. DJ Koze never really disappoints with remixes and this is very special, wistful but somehow a bit goofy too. partially reminds me of some of Chemical Brothers’ more straightforward club moments.

“Solution” by XYZ (Kenton Slash Demon’s 4/4 Therapy)

This is an incredible piece of melodic dancefloor damage. I’m a huge fan on KSD and was a bit surprised about getting such a straight club remix from them, but I love it. Big part of shuffling for records is trying to find records that have multiple functions in my sets – this one could easily be the first or last record or a breathe of magic in the middle.

“Division” by Tycho

I can’t wait for the new Tycho album to come out. Scott Hansen’s project is probably my most played act on Spotify, and for a good reason. The music itself has a very therapeutic effect and weirdly works everywhere from airplanes to the gym. This is just a magnificent piece of very classic Tycho for my ears and it’s on repeat.

“Centre Of The World” by Phil Moffa

This is an amazing set builder and just a dope groove. I’m a sucker for this type of beat building exercises. It’s just a jam that does not end and gets any floor going. This was on a Malawi Beating Heart compilation where a bunch of DJ’s and producers remixed a lot of rare records from Sub-Saharan Africa. The results are magnificent and bring a lot of mystery and live groove to the floors.

The Last Record: Yotto Gives Love To His Peers

Photo of Yotto courtesy of Miro Kalliol.

Yotto’s 2016 is looking up. The Finnish DJ and producer recently released “The Owls,” a deep groove that further defines his shimmery sound. According to the producer, he wrote the track in a hotel in India during his numerous travels. “For me the track represents a more held back tension which is then released in the end with all the synth work coming together,” he said. Since it’s release, the track was chosen as an “Essential New Tune” from Pete Tong and the “Hottest Record in the World” from Annie Mac.

The producer has two more Twin Peaks-inspired releases scheduled before the end of the summer and featuring his distinct blend of the dark and light in his instrumentation. For this edition of “The Last Record,” Yotto chose a handful of selections including the latest from The Avalanches and other recent releases from his producing peers.

Wildflower by The Avalanches

Probably the most hyped album of the summer, but for a good reason. I almost cried a bit when I played this through. It’s such a great piece of cut and paste art that instantly took me back to the days of having Since I Left You on repeat. The whole album is a treasure chest of well known and super obscure samples. Ultimate summer record of 2016, and on the subject of buying records it reminded me of shuffling through endless piles of records as a kid. Nostalgia punch in the nose.

“Energy Flow” by Mano Le Tough (DJ Koze remix)

Been loving the original from Mano Le Tough’s great album for a while now. It’s been one of my favourite records to listen to on flights. This fits that purpose too. DJ Koze never really disappoints with remixes and this is very special, wistful but somehow a bit goofy too. partially reminds me of some of Chemical Brothers’ more straightforward club moments.

“Solution” by XYZ (Kenton Slash Demon’s 4/4 Therapy)

This is an incredible piece of melodic dancefloor damage. I’m a huge fan on KSD and was a bit surprised about getting such a straight club remix from them, but I love it. Big part of shuffling for records is trying to find records that have multiple functions in my sets – this one could easily be the first or last record or a breathe of magic in the middle.

“Division” by Tycho

I can’t wait for the new Tycho album to come out. Scott Hansen’s project is probably my most played act on Spotify, and for a good reason. The music itself has a very therapeutic effect and weirdly works everywhere from airplanes to the gym. This is just a magnificent piece of very classic Tycho for my ears and it’s on repeat.

“Centre Of The World” by Phil Moffa

This is an amazing set builder and just a dope groove. I’m a sucker for this type of beat building exercises. It’s just a jam that does not end and gets any floor going. This was on a Malawi Beating Heart compilation where a bunch of DJ’s and producers remixed a lot of rare records from Sub-Saharan Africa. The results are magnificent and bring a lot of mystery and live groove to the floors.

The Avalanches Postpone Festival Appearances Due To Health Reasons

Wildflower’ album cover from The Avalanches.

After releasing their first album in 15 years and performing live for the first time in a decade, The Avalanches will postpone upcoming festival appearances due to health reasons. The band made the announcement on their Facebook page.

“Preparations for our live show at Splendour are going well but unfortunately due to a medical condition requiring treatment in Australia, Tony has been advised against international travel for the next few months, so with great disappointment we have had to postpone some forthcoming festival appearances in Europe,” the group wrote.

According to the group, rescheduled and new live dates will be announced soon. The group played their new material live for the first time at this year’s Primavera Sound. They were next scheduled to appear in Japan at Fuji Rock Festival ’16 and in France at La Route Du Rock 2016. In June, we spoke with the now-grown up 12-year-old the group sampled on their song, “Subways.”

How The Avalanches Taught Skylar Spence To Appreciate Sampling As A Form Of Expression

Photo by Jordan Neel, courtesy of Skylar Spence’s Facebook

When Australian cult heroes the Avalanches announced their return and highly-anticipated follow-up to their 2000 debut album ‘Since I Left You’ earlier this year, nobody had any idea what to expect from the group’s sophomore release. Would ‘Wildflower’ follow the sample-heavy blueprint of their previous work or be something completely different? How would the trio incorporate a diverse list of guest vocalists including Danny Brown, MF Doom, Toro Y Moi, and Ariel Pink into their lush, textured soundscapes?

Luckily for longtime fans, including American electro-pop musician, producer, and singer Skylar Spence (aka Ryan DeRobertis), the record proves their lengthy hiatus hasn’t diminished their crate-digging mastery, while also featuring Technicolored live instrumentation. We asked DeRobertis to write about his personal history with the Avalanches’ discography and how it influenced his own music, and he gratefully obliged.

The first live show I ever played as Saint Pepsi was in April 2013 for my college radio station’s spring concert, which was headlined by Javelin. I begged the organizers to let me open and they were cool enough to let me do it, especially considering I didn’t own any equipment and hadn’t played a show before. During my soundcheck, I did my bullshit vaporwave thing, and in the green room the dudes from Javelin were like, “We really like your sound, man. It reminds us of the Avalanches!” I was like “Oh, cool, thanks so much!” but I didn’t get the comparison because I had never heard anything from the Avalanches, save “Frontier Psychiatrist.”

You know how the story goes: I download the album, it changes my life, and changes my work ethic in a weird way. Since I Left You was one of the first electronic albums I consciously digested as a “producer” and the technical aspect of their music thrilled me. I became obsessed with their ability to twist and turn different genres of music, weaving seconds of instrumentals together with sound effects and film dialogue in a way that wasn’t corny or disrespectful to the source material. Since I Left You felt more radiant with each listen, more satisfying with the passing of time, and conducive to my greater appreciation of sampling as a form of expression.

I don’t know what it’s like to wait 16 years for a record release. I’m sure that kind of hype would taint my initial reaction towards it, and unsurprisingly, I was hearing from friends that Wildflower didn’t touch its predecessor just hours after it was released online. But I’ve spent most of my spare time digesting the elusive Wildflower since July 1st, and I’m shocked at how quickly it has become one of my favorite listens of all-time.

Although I initially had qualms over lead single “Frankie Sinatra,” which I dismissed the first time I heard it as an “oompah” beat with a Danny Brown verse, I appreciated it more in the context of the record. I became enamored with it once I started paying attention to the crazy shit that was going on in the background. I also hadn’t realized there was original instrumentation on this record. Guest vocalists sure, but songs where there are no samples? Or songs where samples serve as ornaments to the song, rather than the backbone? Or songs where a sample is completely removed from its original context to elicit a different emotional response?

Take “Sunshine,” for example. The song starts out so deceptively simple and cool, like “Oh man, I love what they’re doing with that vocal loop,” until they throw you into the depths of heartbreak ocean 50 seconds in. Play the intro to “Colours” in reverse and you’ll find a secret message: “After the tears, true love can start. Where there’s a heartache, there must be a heart.” I later found out those bars were lifted from the Sandpipers’ version of a Burt Bacharach tune, and it’s through gaining knowledge like this that I more properly appreciate the world they’ve now built around meticulous sampling, in foundation rather than formation. If you’re not actively watching these tracks blend into each other, you probably won’t even realize where you are, or when it’s over.

On the other hand, the “vocals” on the record span a wide scope of subjects: self-love, loving others, flying, isolation, noisy eating, pentagrams, and pot leaves, amongst others. By the time I hit David Berman’s monologue in “Saturday Night Inside Out,” I’m usually winded, but I’m always glued to my seat until the end of the hour-long ride. Even Since I Left You didn’t hit me as strongly as Wildflower does. I don’t see how any love letter to the history of recorded musicto the history of humanitycouldn’t put a smile on your face.

It almost seems too timely that we’re graced with a record of this caliber; maybe we’re too disillusioned by the darkness of modern history to properly appreciate the Avalanches’ childlike sense of wonder. But I also feel like they’ve spent their 16-year long dormancy living and learning too, and it’s with a jaw-dropping expertise that they’re still able to dial in the ornamental magic of their previous work, with less reliance on source material (or at the very least, stunning recreation). If Wildflower didn’t pique your interest on the first listen, I implore you to give it another shot, you might find more beyond the surface of an album that took a pretty long time to put together.

Skylar Spence is on Twitter.

How The Avalanches Taught Skylar Spence To Appreciate Sampling As A Form Of Expression

Photo by Jordan Neel, courtesy of Skylar Spence’s Facebook

When Australian cult heroes the Avalanches announced their return and highly-anticipated follow-up to their 2000 debut album ‘Since I Left You’ earlier this year, nobody had any idea what to expect from the group’s sophomore release. Would ‘Wildflower’ follow the sample-heavy blueprint of their previous work or be something completely different? How would the trio incorporate a diverse list of guest vocalists including Danny Brown, MF Doom, Toro Y Moi, and Ariel Pink into their lush, textured soundscapes?

Luckily for longtime fans, including American electro-pop musician, producer, and singer Skylar Spence (aka Ryan DeRobertis), the record proves their lengthy hiatus hasn’t diminished their crate-digging mastery, while also featuring Technicolored live instrumentation. We asked DeRobertis to write about his personal history with the Avalanches’ discography and how it influenced his own music, and he gratefully obliged.

The first live show I ever played as Saint Pepsi was in April 2013 for my college radio station’s spring concert, which was headlined by Javelin. I begged the organizers to let me open and they were cool enough to let me do it, especially considering I didn’t own any equipment and hadn’t played a show before. During my soundcheck, I did my bullshit vaporwave thing, and in the green room the dudes from Javelin were like, “We really like your sound, man. It reminds us of the Avalanches!” I was like “Oh, cool, thanks so much!” but I didn’t get the comparison because I had never heard anything from the Avalanches, save “Frontier Psychiatrist.”

You know how the story goes: I download the album, it changes my life, and changes my work ethic in a weird way. Since I Left You was one of the first electronic albums I consciously digested as a “producer” and the technical aspect of their music thrilled me. I became obsessed with their ability to twist and turn different genres of music, weaving seconds of instrumentals together with sound effects and film dialogue in a way that wasn’t corny or disrespectful to the source material. Since I Left You felt more radiant with each listen, more satisfying with the passing of time, and conducive to my greater appreciation of sampling as a form of expression.

I don’t know what it’s like to wait 16 years for a record release. I’m sure that kind of hype would taint my initial reaction towards it, and unsurprisingly, I was hearing from friends that Wildflower didn’t touch its predecessor just hours after it was released online. But I’ve spent most of my spare time digesting the elusive Wildflower since July 1st, and I’m shocked at how quickly it has become one of my favorite listens of all-time.

Although I initially had qualms over lead single “Frankie Sinatra,” which I dismissed the first time I heard it as an “oompah” beat with a Danny Brown verse, I appreciated it more in the context of the record. I became enamored with it once I started paying attention to the crazy shit that was going on in the background. I also hadn’t realized there was original instrumentation on this record. Guest vocalists sure, but songs where there are no samples? Or songs where samples serve as ornaments to the song, rather than the backbone? Or songs where a sample is completely removed from its original context to elicit a different emotional response?

Take “Sunshine,” for example. The song starts out so deceptively simple and cool, like “Oh man, I love what they’re doing with that vocal loop,” until they throw you into the depths of heartbreak ocean 50 seconds in. Play the intro to “Colours” in reverse and you’ll find a secret message: “After the tears, true love can start. Where there’s a heartache, there must be a heart.” I later found out those bars were lifted from the Sandpipers’ version of a Burt Bacharach tune, and it’s through gaining knowledge like this that I more properly appreciate the world they’ve now built around meticulous sampling, in foundation rather than formation. If you’re not actively watching these tracks blend into each other, you probably won’t even realize where you are, or when it’s over.

On the other hand, the “vocals” on the record span a wide scope of subjects: self-love, loving others, flying, isolation, noisy eating, pentagrams, and pot leaves, amongst others. By the time I hit David Berman’s monologue in “Saturday Night Inside Out,” I’m usually winded, but I’m always glued to my seat until the end of the hour-long ride. Even Since I Left You didn’t hit me as strongly as Wildflower does. I don’t see how any love letter to the history of recorded musicto the history of humanitycouldn’t put a smile on your face.

It almost seems too timely that we’re graced with a record of this caliber; maybe we’re too disillusioned by the darkness of modern history to properly appreciate the Avalanches’ childlike sense of wonder. But I also feel like they’ve spent their 16-year long dormancy living and learning too, and it’s with a jaw-dropping expertise that they’re still able to dial in the ornamental magic of their previous work, with less reliance on source material (or at the very least, stunning recreation). If Wildflower didn’t pique your interest on the first listen, I implore you to give it another shot, you might find more beyond the surface of an album that took a pretty long time to put together.

Skylar Spence is on Twitter.

The Avalanches Postpone Festival Appearances Due To Health Reasons

Wildflower’ album cover from The Avalanches.

After releasing their first album in 15 years and performing live for the first time in a decade, The Avalanches will postpone upcoming festival appearances due to health reasons. The band made the announcement on their Facebook page.

“Preparations for our live show at Splendour are going well but unfortunately due to a medical condition requiring treatment in Australia, Tony has been advised against international travel for the next few months, so with great disappointment we have had to postpone some forthcoming festival appearances in Europe,” the group wrote.

According to the group, rescheduled and new live dates will be announced soon. The group played their new material live for the first time at this year’s Primavera Sound. They were next scheduled to appear in Japan at Fuji Rock Festival ’16 and in France at La Route Du Rock 2016. In June, we spoke with the now-grown up 12-year-old the group sampled on their song, “Subways.”

The Avalanches Revealed The Samples On Their New Album, 'Wildflower'

‘Wildflower’ album cover from The Avalanches.

In anticipation of the release of Wildflower, the Avalanches first album in 16 years which dropped Friday, Australia’s Triple J spoke with the group about the myriad of samples that comprise the record. Like their debut, Since I Left You, their sophomore release is an eclectic and densely-packed work of art filled with random, left-of-center sounds and field recordings the group has collected over the years.

Their 15-second opening track, “The Leaves Were Falling,” features a sample from a 1950s home recording by Dion McGregor, an American somniloquist. “Frankie Sinatra,” the first single from the new record features a sample of a song called “Bobby Sox Idol” by a 1930s calypso singer named Wilmouth Houdini.


It also includes a sample of “My Favorite Things” from The Sound of Music. “My favorite part about this song is the ‘Favorite Things’ sample, because growing up with five brothers and sisters we used to all watch musicals and The Sound of Music was one of the favorites,” said band member Tony Di Blasi. “We were like little Von Trapp family singers ourselves.”

And “Subways,” their latest single, features a sample of Chandra Oppenheim’s “Subways” from 1980. She was only 12 at the time of her recording. “It must be very strange for her today to hear her 12-year-old self sampled in another dimension exploded around in space and time, coming back out through the radio again,” said band member Robbie Chater.

Read the entire interview on Triple J’s website and stream Wildflower below. Last month, we interviewed Chandra Oppenheim about what it feels like to get sampled 36 years later.

The Avalanches' New Album, 'Wildflower,' Is Streaming One Week Early

‘Wildflower’ album cover from The Avalanches.

Wildflower, The Avalanches’ highly-anticipated second album, just dropped a week early for streaming on Apple Music. The hour-long, 22-track album was previously set to drop July 8 on Astralwerks. It has been 16 years since the group released Since I Left You, their critically-acclaimed debut.

Wildflower is a sonically-dense record featuring the group’s signature throwback soul samples and unique field recordings. Unlike their debut, Wildflower includes a number of guest appearances from musicians including Danny Brown, MF DOOM, Toro y Moi, Jennifer Herrema of Royal Trux, Biz Markie, and Father John Misty. Stream Wildflower below.

Watch the video for “Frankie Sinatra,” their first single from Wildflower, featuring Danny Brown and MF DOOM. In June, we spoke with the now-grown up 12-year-old the group sampled on their new single, “Subways.”

The Avalanches Revealed The Samples On Their New Album, 'Wildflower'

‘Wildflower’ album cover from The Avalanches.

In anticipation of the release of Wildflower, the Avalanches first album in 16 years which dropped Friday, Australia’s Triple J spoke with the group about the myriad of samples that comprise the record. Like their debut, Since I Left You, their sophomore release is an eclectic and densely-packed work of art filled with random, left-of-center sounds and field recordings the group has collected over the years.

Their 15-second opening track, “The Leaves Were Falling,” features a sample from a 1950s home recording by Dion McGregor, an American somniloquist. “Frankie Sinatra,” the first single from the new record features a sample of a song called “Bobby Sox Idol” by a 1930s calypso singer named Wilmouth Houdini.


It also includes a sample of “My Favorite Things” from The Sound of Music. “My favorite part about this song is the ‘Favorite Things’ sample, because growing up with five brothers and sisters we used to all watch musicals and The Sound of Music was one of the favorites,” said band member Tony Di Blasi. “We were like little Von Trapp family singers ourselves.”

And “Subways,” their latest single, features a sample of Chandra Oppenheim’s “Subways” from 1980. She was only 12 at the time of her recording. “It must be very strange for her today to hear her 12-year-old self sampled in another dimension exploded around in space and time, coming back out through the radio again,” said band member Robbie Chater.

Read the entire interview on Triple J’s website and stream Wildflower below. Last month, we interviewed Chandra Oppenheim about what it feels like to get sampled 36 years later.

The Avalanches Revealed The Samples On Their New Album, 'Wildflower'

‘Wildflower’ album cover from The Avalanches.

In anticipation of the release of Wildflower, the Avalanches first album in 16 years which dropped Friday, Australia’s Triple J spoke with the group about the myriad of samples that comprise the record. Like their debut, Since I Left You, their sophomore release is an eclectic and densely-packed work of art filled with random, left-of-center sounds and field recordings the group has collected over the years.

Their 15-second opening track, “The Leaves Were Falling,” features a sample from a 1950s home recording by Dion McGregor, an American somniloquist. “Frankie Sinatra,” the first single from the new record features a sample of a song called “Bobby Sox Idol” by a 1930s calypso singer named Wilmouth Houdini.


It also includes a sample of “My Favorite Things” from The Sound of Music. “My favorite part about this song is the ‘Favorite Things’ sample, because growing up with five brothers and sisters we used to all watch musicals and The Sound of Music was one of the favorites,” said band member Tony Di Blasi. “We were like little Von Trapp family singers ourselves.”

And “Subways,” their latest single, features a sample of Chandra Oppenheim’s “Subways” from 1980. She was only 12 at the time of her recording. “It must be very strange for her today to hear her 12-year-old self sampled in another dimension exploded around in space and time, coming back out through the radio again,” said band member Robbie Chater.

Read the entire interview on Triple J’s website and stream Wildflower below. Last month, we interviewed Chandra Oppenheim about what it feels like to get sampled 36 years later.

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The Avalanches' New Album, 'Wildflower,' Is Streaming One Week Early

‘Wildflower’ album cover from The Avalanches.

Wildflower, The Avalanches’ highly-anticipated second album, just dropped a week early for streaming on Apple Music. The hour-long, 22-track album was previously set to drop July 8 on Astralwerks. It has been 16 years since the group released Since I Left You, their critically-acclaimed debut.

Wildflower is a sonically-dense record featuring the group’s signature throwback soul samples and unique field recordings. Unlike their debut, Wildflower includes a number of guest appearances from musicians including Danny Brown, MF DOOM, Toro y Moi, Jennifer Herrema of Royal Trux, Biz Markie, and Father John Misty. Stream Wildflower below.

Watch the video for “Frankie Sinatra,” their first single from Wildflower, featuring Danny Brown and MF DOOM. In June, we spoke with the now-grown up 12-year-old the group sampled on their new single, “Subways.”

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