Swedish Festival Cancels 2018 Event After Reports of Sexual Assault & Rape

Sweden’s Bråvalla Festival has cancelled its 2018 event following multiple reports of sexual assault or rape at this year’s event. According to the Associated Press, this marks the second consecutive year of reports of rape or sexual assault at the Norrkoping, Sweden festival.

Eleven cases of sexual abuse and one rape have been reported during this year’s festival, which took place from July 28 to July 1. Bravalla reportedly made the decision to cancel next year’s festival after a rape was reported on Friday.

In a translated statement posted to their Facebook page, the festival wrote, “Bråvalla 2017 became one in many ways amazing, joyful and sunny festival. At the same time, it was also a frustrating, gloomy, strange, sad and rainy festival. But you should know that we are extremely proud and grateful to be able to create and experience all of this with you.” A representative from the festival did not immediately return a request for additional comment.

Scheduled performers for this year’s festival included The Chainsmokers, Martin Garrix, and Oliver Heldens.

SHXCXCHCXSH's "Stämma #2" Is a Gothic Techno Transmission

While the majority of SHXCXCHCXSH‘s records to date have been released on Shifted’s techno imprint Avian, the anonymous Swedish duo recently launched their own imprint Rösten, and are gearing up to release its first EP themselves.

Today they’ve shared a new single “Stämma #2,” which finds the pair applying gothic horror ambiance to claustrophobic techno, constructing the track around a two-chord progression that wouldn’t sound out of place in black metal. The gravely stomping kick drum at the center of the stereo field is flanked by flapping, vaguely acidic synths, which come together to deliver the song’s anxious velocity.

Rösten 1 is out June 23 and will be available digitally and on vinyl.

Follow Alexander on Twitter.

Sleeparchive Evokes The Cathartic Anger Of "Grief" On A New Track

Photo courtesy of the artist

Copenhagen minimalist Roger Semsroth, a.k.a. Sleeparchive, today shared the belting lead track from his forthcoming Untitled EP on Swedish techno imprint Arsenik. Titled “Grief,” the tune evokes one step of its eponymous seven-stage process a whole lot more than any otheranger. Where much of Semsroth’s discography has emphasized precision and the cerebral effects of infinitesimally subtle variation, this record is pure body music, thrashing and bucking about in pure recklessness, at least by Semsroth’s standards. The length of the recordover ten minutesadds to the sense of imprudence, too, creating a feeling of endured, cathartic suffering.

Semsroth told THUMP about the technical details of the track’s construction over email. “The track was arranged in October 2016 from various loops recorded over two years,” he said. “The percussion sounds were made with drumazon. All other sounds are made with an SH-101, and everything was processed in Ableton Live.”

The new EP will be released by Sweden’s Arsenik Records on April 30; it is available for pre-order.

Untitled tracklist:

1. Grief
2. Roses
3. Steel

Follow Alexander on Twitter.

Kornél Kovács Is Making House Music Fun Again

Kornl Kovcs (Photo by Hjalmar Rechlin)

“Respect to Avicii! He’s like the Omar-S of EDM,” says Kornl Kovcs over Skype from Stockholm. He explains that he once spent months trying to make a balls-to-the-walls, big-room track as a personal challengebut gave up after several failed attempts. ” were all starting to get proper careers, while I was still just DJing all the time in Stockholm. I felt like I was stuck in a rut. What if music wasn’t going to be my career? I actually was fantasizing about becoming a doctor.”

In 2008, just as his anxiety was reaching a zenith, Kovcs applied to the Barcelona edition of Red Bull Music Academy, and was accepted. “That was super-inspiring,” he says, “not so much in what I actually learned, but in terms of meeting young, like-minded people who felt the same aspirations and frustrations as I was.” When he returned to Stockholm from Barcelona, Kovcs decided to look for a studio and found a space that was big enough for three people. He decided to get in touch with a pair of Stockholm acquaintances, Axel Boman and Petter Nordkvis, whose music he admired. “I had been a big fan of the stuff that Petter had done with James Holden’s label Border Community a few years before, and I was also digging Axel’s new tracks that he was just starting to put out,” Kovcs says. “I asked them if they wanted to do itand we ended up becoming best friends really quickly.”

Kornl Kovcs, Axel Boman and Petter Nordkvist at Beats in Space (Photo via Studio Barnhus/Facebook)

In 2009, Studio Barnhusnamed after its location on Barnhusgatan, or “Orphanage Street”sprang into being. Clubs began to book the trio under the same name, and in 2010, the crew took the next logical step: putting out a record of their own music, “just to see if it could be done,” Kovcs says. The fledgling Studio Barnhus label’s first release was Good Children Make Bad Grown Ups, a mini-compilation featuring one track each by Kovcs, Boman, and Nordkvist, as well as a fourth by a mysterious producer named Gino Bomino, who Kovcs claims is “a friend who hails from the old, traditional Italian edit-maker family, the Bominos.” Kovcs’s contribution “Baby Step,” with its syncopated rhythms and sampled pop-song vocal, is a relatively straightforward deep-houser in comparison to The Bellsbut it was quirky enough to hint at the ebullience of his later productions.

In the ensuing six years, Studio Barnhus’ steady output has cemented the imprint’s rep as a home for the kind of dance music that’s both fun and functional, with slightly wonky, fully wonderful releases in the past year from the likes of Your Planet Is Next, HHNY and Baba Stiltz. Label co-founder Boman says The Bells represents the reason he dreamed of starting a label in the first place, calling it “one of our best, most innovative, and creative releases to date.” “The fact that one of my best friends has managed to do this on the label we share together makes me so proud that I want to cry,” Boman says in the album’s press release. Apparently, crying is a thing among the Studio Barnhus crewKovcs makes light of his labelmate’s high praise, saying, “Whenever I play something for Axel and Petter and they say, ‘Yeah, this is super cool, man,’ I’m still kind of convinced that they’re just being nice and don’t want to see me cry.”

As for the near short-term future, Kovcs has a packed schedule, with gigs in Australia, Brazil and throughout Europe filling his calendar for the next few months; if all goes well, he’ll be hitting the States this autumn. Kovcs also says to expect “brilliant stuff” coming soon from a mix of newcomers and usual suspects on Studio Barnhus, speaking of Baba Stiltz in particular with an admiration that approaches awe: “He’s just getting started; he is going to blow people’s minds pretty soon.” But when asked if he feels like a mentor to Stiltzor any of the label’s artistsKovcs demurs. “I feel like I’m still starting out myself,” he admits. “I’ve always been ‘the young kid’ doing this, and I still kind of feel that way.”

Kornél Kovács Is Making House Music Fun Again

Kornl Kovcs (Photo by Hjalmar Rechlin)

“Respect to Avicii! He’s like the Omar-S of EDM,” says Kornl Kovcs over Skype from Stockholm. He explains that he once spent months trying to make a balls-to-the-walls, big-room track as a personal challengebut gave up after several failed attempts. ” were all starting to get proper careers, while I was still just DJing all the time in Stockholm. I felt like I was stuck in a rut. What if music wasn’t going to be my career? I actually was fantasizing about becoming a doctor.”

In 2008, just as his anxiety was reaching a zenith, Kovcs applied to the Barcelona edition of Red Bull Music Academy, and was accepted. “That was super-inspiring,” he says, “not so much in what I actually learned, but in terms of meeting young, like-minded people who felt the same aspirations and frustrations as I was.” When he returned to Stockholm from Barcelona, Kovcs decided to look for a studio and found a space that was big enough for three people. He decided to get in touch with a pair of Stockholm acquaintances, Axel Boman and Petter Nordkvis, whose music he admired. “I had been a big fan of the stuff that Petter had done with James Holden’s label Border Community a few years before, and I was also digging Axel’s new tracks that he was just starting to put out,” Kovcs says. “I asked them if they wanted to do itand we ended up becoming best friends really quickly.”

Kornl Kovcs, Axel Boman and Petter Nordkvist (Photo via Studio Barnhus/Facebook)

In 2009, Studio Barnhusnamed after its location on Barnhusgatan, or “Orphanage Street”sprang into being. Clubs began to book the trio under the same name, and in 2010, the crew took the next logical step: putting out a record of their own music, “just to see if it could be done,” Kovcs says. The fledgling Studio Barnhus label’s first release was Good Children Make Bad Grown Ups, a mini-compilation featuring one track each by Kovcs, Boman, and Nordkvist, as well as a fourth by a mysterious producer named Gino Bomino, who Kovcs claims is “a friend who hails from the old, traditional Italian edit-maker family, the Bominos.” Kovcs’s contribution “Baby Step,” with its syncopated rhythms and sampled pop-song vocal, is a relatively straightforward deep-houser in comparison to The Bellsbut it was quirky enough to hint at the ebullience of his later productions.

In the ensuing six years, Studio Barnhus’ steady output has cemented the imprint’s rep as a home for the kind of dance music that’s both fun and functional, with slightly wonky, fully wonderful releases in the past year from the likes of Your Planet Is Next, HHNY and Baba Stiltz. Label co-founder Boman says The Bells represents the reason he dreamed of starting a label in the first place, calling it “one of our best, most innovative, and creative releases to date.” “The fact that one of my best friends has managed to do this on the label we share together makes me so proud that I want to cry,” Boman says in the album’s press release. Apparently, crying is a thing among the Studio Barnhus crewKovcs makes light of his labelmate’s high praise, saying, “Whenever I play something for Axel and Petter and they say, ‘Yeah, this is super cool, man,’ I’m still kind of convinced that they’re just being nice and don’t want to see me cry.”

As for the near short-term future, Kovcs has a packed schedule, with gigs in Australia, Brazil and throughout Europe filling his calendar for the next few months; if all goes well, he’ll be hitting the States this autumn. Kovcs also says to expect “brilliant stuff” coming soon from a mix of newcomers and usual suspects on Studio Barnhus, speaking of Baba Stiltz in particular with an admiration that approaches awe: “He’s just getting started; he is going to blow people’s minds pretty soon.” But when asked if he feels like a mentor to Stiltzor any of the label’s artistsKovcs demurs. “I feel like I’m still starting out myself,” he admits. “I’ve always been ‘the young kid’ doing this, and I still kind of feel that way.”

Sad Boys Producer Gud FKA Yung Gud Returns With Obfuscated R&B Single

Photo courtesy of the artist

Stockholm producer and noted Yung Lean/Sad Boys affiliate, Yung Gud, has abbreviated his name to simply Gud, and today THUMP is excited to premiere his debut track under the abbreviated moniker. “Body Horror” finds Micke Berlander running obfuscated, hazy R&B through a grab bag of blemishing distortion techniques, decorating it with light discordance and snippets of ravey synth patches for texture. Fittingly, it shares its name with a style of fiction known for its gut-churning corporeal thrills.

“My first original in almost two years,” he said to THUMP via email. “Receive it with love and respect.”

When Noisey interviewed Yung Lean in 2014, he said: “The best thing about music is that it’s invisible.”

Follow Alexander on Twitter.

Powered by WPeMatico