Skyshaker Shares Volatile Remix of Banjee Report's Chemsex Tale "pNp"

After recently penning a powerful essay for THUMP about the queer community’s meth and GHB epidemic, Chicago artist Anthony “aCe” Pabey’s group Banjee Report has released an explosive new single engaging with the same themes.

The track is called “pNp,” which is short for “party and play”—terminology for chemsex parties often organized on dating apps where people combine sex with hard drugs. The FUTUREHOOD founders’ song approaches pNp from a first-person narrative, bringing the extremely complex emotional space of its subject matter to life with mercurial, rapid-fire verses. The remix comes courtesy of Qween Beat affiliate Skyshaker, who lends the tune some of their signature hardcore-influenced kinetic flourishes to create a visceral sense of volatility.

The artists told THUMP about their creative mental space while making “pNp” over email. “Reporting from the underbelly of queer life, this track for us is linked to instinct, purity and the drive of the physical body to release powerful and emotional forces—like rage with ensuing chaos and destruction,” they said.

Back in May, Pabey joined THUMP for a roundtable discussion on the state of gay nightlife in the US.

Listen to “pNp” below, and look for the group’s full-length album on FUTUREHOOD in October.

Follow Alexander on Twitter.

Looking for the Next Great Club Track? Just Ask Oscar Nñ of Papi Juice

Whether it’s for playing out at a club or listening at home, DJs and producers typically have an encyclopedic hoard of music, new and old. In The Last Record, they tell us about the last three songs or albums they’ve purchased, and why these were important additions to their music collection.

This week, we spoke to Oscar Nñ, a resident DJ of Papi Juice, a rotating party celebrating queer and trans people of color. You can next catch Oscar at the Red Bull Music Academy Festival on May 7th as part of “A Bed-Stuy Function” with artists such as Juliana Huxtable, Tygapaw, and Bearcat of Discwoman, among others. “I’m very very very excited about playing this party,” Oscar said. “It’s a huge honor to be playing Red Bull Music Festival.”

Papi Juice celebrates their four-year anniversary party on Saturday, June 24. “It’s really crazy and really exciting,” said Oscar. “We have big, big plans for that one.”


Indy Flow – “Rebotando”

This track is super important to me because there’s been a resurgence of female reggaeton artists. In this song, she’s talking about how her butt bounces when she’s riding someone. This is so amazing. For me, it’s just all about female empowerment and she just gives no fucks. I really like this song for that reason. And the rhymes in general and her flow is really good. I’m really excited to see what she gets up to [in her career].

There’s a big controversy in Puerto Rico actually because people were asking how there was a woman singing all of this stuff. But then, in the reverse, you have male reggaeton artists that are so nasty and are allowed to get away with so much shit. But just because it’s a woman, she can’t talk about how much she’s enjoying riding that dick.

quest?onmarc – “WORK THIS”

Quest?onmarc is a New York-based artist and part of the collective Qween Beat. Quest?onmarc is actually one of the most talented all around artists I know. They’re an amazing DJ, an amazing producer and an amazing performer. Quest?onmarc played Papi Juice like a year or so ago and that’s when we met. It also doesn’t hurt that they’re the sweetest, kindest soul.

Quest?onmarc DJed and wore this outfit of a neon blonde wig and these platform shoes. They’re already a pretty tall person, but then they were taller. They were standing over the CDJs, looking so amazing, and playing all of this great music while vogueing to it at the same time. I was just like, “Ugh. Amazing.” You wanna dance to their music and just be in the moment, but you also want to watch them perform because they’re so good. It was a full performance. It wasn’t just a DJ set.

This song is off their new EP. You can really hear Quest?onmarc’s talent and how careful they are with music. Most of my DJ sets will have an edit from Quest?onmarc. That’s how amazing I think they are.

I feel like Quest?onmarc’s music is just essential to any club environment. It’s all very bass heavy. But they’ve also done a bunch of edits in Baltimore club and regular house genres. Whatever I’m playing, whatever style I’m on, I know there will be a question mark edit to fit that mood.

Swisha – “Losing UR Mind (SWISHA’s B-More Edit)

I watched the first season of The Get Down. It’s not the perfect show, but to watch such a positive story about young people of color and how they started something so big was really inspiring to me. It’s funny. It is on Netflix, but I feel like it’s a pretty important show, not only for the birth of hip hop. It just talks about the history of the Bronx and how it is such a cultural birthplace of so many movements. I feel like a lot of times, when you think of New York, you think of Manhattan. You think of Brooklyn. You never talk about the Bronx. But the Bronx’s history is so important to what makes New York, New York.

I’m from the area, so anything B-more is amazing. I was going through a really rough time this week and I saw this song and just rode the subway, listening to this song on loop. This song has quintessential New York vibes. There’s just so much going on in your life and you’re always riding the subway and you don’t know what’s going to happen next or what your next move is going to be. It’s all very fast-paced and I feel like it matches the beat of the song and the story that it tells. I feel like people will really really enjoy it in a club setting.

WRACK – “Kamui (Wasted Fates Remix)”

WRACK is a prolific producer based out of Tokyo and Wasted Fates is a papi from the N.A.A.F.I. crew in Mexico City. When I heard this track, I was like, “Oh my God. This song is so good.”

I’m just so down for the cultural exchanges happening in this song. It’s really evident. You can tell that there’s an inspiration from Latin America, but there are other sounds in there that really make you wonder. It’s really complex and beautiful.

Jasmine Infiniti x K.Hole_Kardashian – “CANCELL-T”

My friend Maya and I were out the other night and we were just talking. We were having this bad night and were like, “Ugh, tonight is cancelled.” And then Maya was like, “You have to heard this song.”

It starts with Jasmine listing phrases that have been cancelled. And so she starts to say: fierce, fabulous, slay, yes queen, Brooklyn, Oakland, the gender binary. This song is really great because it’s not only hilarious; it’s also really brilliant. All of these actually ARE cancelled. The gender binary is very much cancelled. Soccer moms vogueing is very much cancelled.


Britt Julious is on Twitter

Quest?onmarc's Thunderous New EP Is Dedicated to Self-Discovery

NYC-based Qween Beat affiliate Quest?onmarc today shared a visceral self-released EP titled ? : ID. Their new five-track work is named after Freud’s concept of the id—the part of the human psyche that impulsively produces basic drives and instincts—and each of its thunderous ballroom tracks corresponds to a different vogue dance element. They are mainly composed of classic house elements—including, of course, the iconic ballroom ha crash sample—re-contextualized in an austere yet high-impact manner.

THUMP interviewed the artist over email, where we talked about how the EP came together, their relationship to the House of Amazon, and more. 

Can you tell us about the thinking behind this EP?
? : ID is the first in a series of works dedicated to self-discovery. Developed of instinct and less of intent, I worked off of emotion.

2016 saw a lot of new experiences for me. Perhaps this was a reaction? Those nights at the helm playing live for the first times had inspired me to dig in… my goal wasn’t to create a body of work but it’s like painting: eventually you stand back and realize you’ve got something going on.

What are the vogue dance elements these songs correspond to?
There are five core elements to vogue performance, leading off with a display of how neatly one can articulate a story with their hands, in “Work This.” The track feels like my journey toward self-acceptance and empowerment as queer youth. What more can be said to someone who owns themselves and challenges naysayers to “Work This”? Not a lot! 

Next up are the catwalk and duck walk, two transitional elements that glue the show together. Both elements require a great deal of balance and posture which I feel “Cunty” and “The ? Ha” illustrate. Rounding out performance are the hallmark spin and dip combo which I really went for with the use of negative space in ‘Elevator’.

There are also non-dancing categories such as face and runway. “Walk 4 Me” is for the non-performance kids.

What is your relationship with the House of Amazon like?
After a few years in and around the ballroom scene, mostly interacting through the weekly NYC-based Vogue Knights party, I started to receive offers to join different houses or invitations to sit in on house practices. When I would follow up and ask, “Why this house?” or “Why that house?,” I’d either be met with blank stares or shining superlatives suggesting that joining would be the obvious choice. This never really resonated with me and I held off from being affiliated for most of my early years in the ballroom community. This status is called being “007.”

I met Amazon Mother Leiomy, the Wonder Woman of Vogue, years prior through her intimate classes held in dance studios around the city. I was always taken by her grace, poise, fluidity, and ability to make dizzying spins and breakback stunts look effortless. Over the years I’d seen my own progress take form and she had taken note as well. I was tapped to join. Leiomy shared that this would be a different experience.

“The House of Amazon is not about walking balls and being ‘fab,'” she said recently on Facebook. “I created my house to help my kids grown individually in and out the scene. I wanted to bring back the true aspect of what a house is suppose to be (family, support, unity, compassion, loyalty, etc…) and to bring back what’s missing in the scene. “

We are called Amazon after the women of Themyscira!

The artwork for this release is really beautiful. What were you going for with it?
I took the cover photo with my phone’s self timer about 2 years ago. Long before I’d even thought of DJing or producing… there was no intent at the time other than chasing a feeling.

Meet the stars of NYC’s ballroom community in a 2016 documentary from THUMP’s Night Visions series, featuring MikeQ, Gisele Xtravaganza, and Leggo “Old Navy” LaBeija; after that, revisit Qween Beat’s debut compilation Qweendom.

? : ID is out now.

Follow Alexander on Twitter.

Inside 'Walk For Me,' A Heart-Stopping Film About Motherhood In Ballroom Culture

Still from Walk for Me.

When he was sixteen, director Elegance Bratton left his childhood home in New Jersey and headed to Christopher Street. Like a lot LGBTQ teens of color from the greater NYC areamany of them rejected by their families for their sexuality and gender expressionhe found a new home on that West Village thoroughfare, immersing himself in the community there, as well as the city’s thriving ballroom scene. His new narrative short, Walk for Mewhich follows a young ballroom performer, Hanna, as she steps out into the world as a womanis a rare film about the scene from someone who actually grew up inside of it. Aside from Hanna’s corrections-officer mother, Andreaplayed by actress Yolanda Ross, from The Get Downits cast consists entirely of performers and personalities from the ballroom world, including Aaliya King, Brenda Holder, Kia LaBeija, and MikeQ, whose recent Qween Beat label compilation, Queendom, gives the film its propulsive soundtrack.

But Walk for Mewhich is currently touring the festival circuit, and recently took home an award for Best LGBTQ film from Ann Arborisn’t just a ballroom story. It’s also a story about motherhood, and the complexities of family life for queer teens like Hanna. Through a delicate choreography of loaded glances and small hand gestures, it captures Hanna’s struggle for acceptance from her biological mother, as well as her discovery of a second support system in Paris Continental, a fictional vogue femme legend played by real-life vogue femme starlette Brenda Holder. We spoke to Bratton about the story behind Walk for Me, and why you can’t talk about ballroom without talking about family.

THUMP: How did you get involved with this community?
Elegance Bratton: I was kicked out of my house when I was 16 for being gay; my mom basically made it impossible for me to be home because of my sexuality. After I left, I hopped on a train. I was really upset and I didn’t have any money, but I saw three black gay guys having a really good time, so I followed them to a place called Christopher Street, and Christopher Street became kind of like a spiritual home for me.

Ten years later, after some time in the military, I got to Columbia University and was like, “Who am I? Where am I from?” So I went back to Christopher Street and started making a documentary. From that docwhich was called Pier Kids: The LifeI published a photo book called Bound By Night. It dawned on me that the thing I had gotten from the communityfrom being black and gaywas this new family, this chosen family.

I got into NYU Tisch, and I wrote Walk For Me for my second year film. It was inspired by my own journey of being homeless and having to make a new family. Bound By Night is about families that are bound by the time of day and not by bloodhow did these trans women mentor and raise gay children? So when it came time to make a film, it was a no-brainer for me to retrace my footsteps and to get into the story of Hanna.

How did you come up with the story?
I spent about four years going to balls pretty much every weekend. You go there and you see a wide range of age groups in the femme queen and trans women categories. And it’s like two or three o’clock in the morning, and will be the same characters, same castjust a lot more in depth. In Walk for Me, we’re very contained in the black experience, and in the feature we’re looking at these black folks in connection to the city they live in. So there’s white characters, there’s Asian characters, there’s shop owners and Bodegasyou get to see them in the real New York. There’s a great scene I’m writing on the Brooklyn Bridge. And it’s more about how once Hanna makes this choice, she’s in the world.

Catch Walk for Me at festivals across the US:

Garden State Film Festival, April 2, 2017 at 12pm

Athens International Film Festival, April 6, 2017 at 7:30pm

Wicked Queer Boston Saturday, April 8, 2017 at 4pm

Ivy Film Festival at Brown University, April 14, 2017 at 7pm

Queer Hippo International LGBT Film Festival in Houston, April 26-30

Watch The Colorful Video For The Theme Song From The Voguing Film 'Kiki'

Photo courtesy of Sundance Selects

Over two decades on from the release of seminal ballroom-culture documentary Paris is Burning comes KIKI, a new, coming-of-age film that follows a group of LGBTQ youths of color within New York’s kiki scene. Directed by Swedish filmmaker Sara Jorden (who also wrote KIKI alongside ballroom gatekeeper and activist Twiggy Pucci Garon), the movie premiered last year at Sundance and will officially open in U.S. theaters starting February 24.

The score for KIKI was composed by Qween Beat, the collective headed by ballroom producer MikeQ, a past THUMP cover star who has been vocal about the scene’s appropriation by non-ballroom artists and corporations. Today, THUMP is premiering the music video for KIKI‘s eponymous theme, crafted by Qween Beat member Divoli S’vere. Among an ebullient, vogue-heavy montage of flying limbs, bold looks, and other footage from the film, S’vere speaks over a metallic beat that’s as sharp-edged as it is playful: “Let’s turn it out at the function / We’ll cause a lot of destruction / We’ll get our tens and at the end we just pretend that we’re not friends.”

S’vere tells THUMP over email, “I was inspired by the colors within the Kiki Ballroom scene, the colors being the personalities and the different people. The LGBTQ community as a whole is the most entertaining and creative community full of gender-bending sounds, visual arts and concepts. I took that expression and combined it with my raw ‘Severe’ sound to come up with the theme that would embody what the Kiki film and what having an actual Kiki is all about.”

Adds Jorden, who also directed the music video, “The film KIKI is about protest and pleasure. In Divoli’s alluring voice there is a powerful and radical expression of femininity, of cuntness, but also rage; against homophobia, against white supremacy; against the toxic masculinity of the Trump administration. As a director I was thrilled to work with the artists in Qween Beat. Their music is a crucial part of the film KIKI.”

Watch “Kiki” below.

“KIKI” – MUSIC VIDEO from Hard Working Movies on Vimeo.

Five Artists Tell Us About The Lasting Influence Of 'Paris Is Burning’ 25 Years Later

This article originally appeared on THUMP Canada.

At the rate mainstream pop culture’s been going the last few decades, the early gay underground figureheads should have a mountain of invoices for all the times their culture has been borrowed without acknowledgement.

It’s hard to dismiss the importance of Madonna’s “Vogue” in the realm of club history, being that this timeless hit brought vogueing into a more commercial sphere. Unbeknownst to many who idolize her however, the song is void of a narrative that’s ethos dates back to the 1960s, when the Harlem ballroom scene first gave African and Latino queers a safe haven to craft early blueprints of identity and performance. Even when dissecting the work of FKA twigs, an artist whose homages to the scene in her live sets walks a fine line between appropriation and appreciation, one could argue her actions perpetuate the continuous smudging of QPOC stories and imagery for white consumption.

No matter how you slice it though, gay themes and lingo deemed trendy today simply aren’t a new thing. Almost all these elements are acquired from iconic looks, phrases, and legacies depicted by director Jennie Livingston in her 1991 documentary Paris Is Burning. Set in New York City during the 1980s, the critically-acclaimed but controversial film chronicles the lives of prominent members of the ballroom scene, navigating race, gender, and sexuality, all while bringing trophies and accolades to their respective “houses.”

There’s no denying the lasting cultural, political, and socio-economic impact of Paris Is Burning on mainstream pop culture, and most importantly, the LGBTQ community. For queers artists with visions modeled after those of pioneers like Octavia Saint Laurent or Willi Ninja, this movie played an important role in informing their evolving careers. With the film celebrating its 25th anniversary next week, we spoke to five artists from different cities and backgrounds about how Paris Is Burning has influenced their creative expression, and helped shape their communities and personal views.

Mister Wallace, New York-based rapper and Banjee Report member:

“When I was in high school, my first encounter with ballroom culture and voguing was from clips found on a now defunct YouTube channel. My cousin, who was active in the scene in Atlanta, sent me clips of the kids voguing down in Atlanta and NYC. It spoke to me instantly. As a black queer growing up in the whitewashed suburbs of Chicago, I was longing for any type of visibility or representation. The dance and the culture around balls was magnetic and it was only a few years after high school that I found myself walking as an black queer clubs like the Generator and Prop House at such an early age gave me more of an appreciation for the culture. But the movie was the first time that I witnessed a true reflection of myself in popular media, of the people that I knew, and a vernacular very similar to the one we utilized. However, I was aware that the documentary was not the actual culture itself. I knew it was just a small glimpse into a culture that was decades old and much too complex to be captured on film because the culture was still flourishing around me.

Upon joining the House of Escada, it was a prerequisite to begin walking the category “Butch Queen Voguing Like a Femme Queen.” I studied the legends and current stars of performance via VHS tapes shared through underground networks of friends and house members. VHS tapes progressed into DVDs before YouTube revolutionized the way that ballroom culture was disseminated. At the forefront of sharing ballroom content is Ballroom Throwbacks, a team that has been pivotal in spreading the culture globally in an unprecedented manner along with creating original entertainment. In terms of artists today, when I witness the soul-stirring artistry in Kiddy Smile‘s latest video “Let A B!tch Know” or Mister Wallace’s ‘It Girl,” I am reminded of the ways in which ballroom culture has morphed from its NYC roots to a queer diasporic phenomenon.”

Max Mohenu is on Twitter.

MikeQ’s Qween Beat Label Releases Infectious ‘Qweendom’ Compilation

Artwork courtesy of label

New Jersey ballroom DJ MikeQ’s Qween Beat imprint has dropped its hotly anticipated first release on the label. The Qweendom compilation consists of 11 tracks from ballroom musicians such as Byrell the Great and LSDXOXO. MikeQ founded Qween Beat as a label solely dedicated to ballroom/vogue music, as opposed to his much less classifiable work with Fade to Mind which takes from a plethora of influences as well as ballroom.

The label boasts over 20 artists, 17 of which appear on this compilation. “Get Sum,” Mike Q’s collab with the late house producer, Romanthony, and Byrell the Great’s “Bubble Drip,” two tracks already released on SoundCloud, also made the comp. Both are frenetic tracks with stripped down synth runs and zealous lyrics. Like a lot of ballroom, there’s a noticeable Jersey club influence, in both syncopation and sassy vulgarity. A must-get for torrid, end of August parties.

Listen to “Get Sum” below and buy the compilation on iTunes. Read about the time MikeQ and Venus X brought ballroom to Mexico City.

MikeQ’s Qween Beat Label Releases Infectious ‘Qweendom’ Compilation

Artwork courtesy of label

New Jersey ballroom DJ MikeQ’s Qween Beat imprint has dropped its hotly anticipated first release on the label. The Queendom compilation consists of 11 tracks from ballroom musicians such as Byrell the Great and LSDXOXO. MikeQ founded Qween Beat as a label solely dedicated to ballroom/vogue music, as opposed to his much less classifiable work with Fade to Mind which takes from a plethora of influences as well as ballroom.

The label boasts over 20 artists, 17 of which appear on this compilation. “Get Sum,” Mike Q’s collab with the late house producer, Romanthony, and Byrell the Great’s “Bubble Drip,” two tracks already released on SoundCloud, also made the comp. Both are frenetic tracks with stripped down synth runs and zealous lyrics. Like a lot of ballroom, there’s a noticeable Jersey club influence, in both syncopation and sassy vulgarity. A must-get for torrid, end of August parties.

Listen to “Get Sum” below and buy the compilation on iTunes. Read about the time MikeQ and Venus X brought ballroom to Mexico City.

Five Artists Tell Us About The Lasting Influence Of 'Paris Is Burning’ 25 Years Later

This article originally appeared on THUMP Canada.

At the rate mainstream pop culture’s been going the last few decades, the early gay underground figureheads should have a mountain of invoices for all the times their culture has been borrowed without acknowledgement.

It’s hard to dismiss the importance of Madonna’s “Vogue” in the realm of club history, being that this timeless hit brought vogueing into a more commercial sphere. Unbeknownst to many who idolize her however, the song is void of a narrative that’s ethos dates back to the 1960s, when the Harlem ballroom scene first gave African and Latino queers a safe haven to craft early blueprints of identity and performance. Even when dissecting the work of FKA twigs, an artist whose homages to the scene in her live sets walks a fine line between appropriation and appreciation, one could argue her actions perpetuate the continuous smudging of QPOC stories and imagery for white consumption.

No matter how you slice it though, gay themes and lingo deemed trendy today simply aren’t a new thing. Almost all these elements are acquired from iconic looks, phrases, and legacies depicted by director Jennie Livingston in her 1991 documentary Paris Is Burning. Set in New York City during the 1980s, the critically-acclaimed but controversial film chronicles the lives of prominent members of the ballroom scene, navigating race, gender, and sexuality, all while bringing trophies and accolades to their respective “houses.”

There’s no denying the lasting cultural, political, and socio-economic impact of Paris Is Burning on mainstream pop culture, and most importantly, the LGBTQ community. For queers artists with visions modeled after those of pioneers like Octavia Saint Laurent or Willi Ninja, this movie played an important role in informing their evolving careers. With the film celebrating its 25th anniversary next week, we spoke to five artists from different cities and backgrounds about how Paris Is Burning has influenced their creative expression, and helped shape their communities and personal views.

Mister Wallace, New York-based rapper and Banjee Report member:

“When I was in high school, my first encounter with ballroom culture and voguing was from clips found on a now defunct YouTube channel. My cousin, who was active in the scene in Atlanta, sent me clips of the kids voguing down in Atlanta and NYC. It spoke to me instantly. As a black queer growing up in the whitewashed suburbs of Chicago, I was longing for any type of visibility or representation. The dance and the culture around balls was magnetic and it was only a few years after high school that I found myself walking as an black queer clubs like the Generator and Prop House at such an early age gave me more of an appreciation for the culture. But the movie was the first time that I witnessed a true reflection of myself in popular media, of the people that I knew, and a vernacular very similar to the one we utilized. However, I was aware that the documentary was not the actual culture itself. I knew it was just a small glimpse into a culture that was decades old and much too complex to be captured on film because the culture was still flourishing around me.

Upon joining the House of Escada, it was a prerequisite to begin walking the category “Butch Queen Voguing Like a Femme Queen.” I studied the legends and current stars of performance via VHS tapes shared through underground networks of friends and house members. VHS tapes progressed into DVDs before YouTube revolutionized the way that ballroom culture was disseminated. At the forefront of sharing ballroom content is Ballroom Throwbacks, a team that has been pivotal in spreading the culture globally in an unprecedented manner along with creating original entertainment. In terms of artists today, when I witness the soul-stirring artistry in Kiddy Smile‘s latest video “Let A B!tch Know” or Mister Wallace’s ‘It Girl,” I am reminded of the ways in which ballroom culture has morphed from its NYC roots to a queer diasporic phenomenon.”

Max Mohenu is on Twitter.

MikeQ Shares Archival Collaboration With Legendary House Vocalist Romanthony On New Single

Album art courtesy of the label

New Jersey producer MikeQ has shared the third single from his ballroom label Qween Beat‘s hotly anticipated debut compilation Qweendom, and it’s something of a once-in-a-lifetime treat. “Get Sum” finds Michael Cox sharing a collaboration with legendary house vocalist and producer Romanthony that was begun while he was still alive, and completed after his death in 2013. The singer is perhaps most famous for his work on Daft Punk’s “One More Time,” and Cox expertly works with his voice here by integrating vintage-styled synths and sampling techniques with his own signature approach to high-impact arrangement. In that way it carries a real aura of timelessness, which is more than appropriate for for the intergenerational exchange it represents.

“I want to say I started talking to Anthony in 2011; we had a mutual friend DJ MaryMac in New Jersey who is also currently Madonna’s tour DJ,” said MikeQ to The FADER in an interview. “After he emailed me, I learned that he frequently popped into the live Vogue Knights stream I had going around that time, and he then let me know how inspired he was by the culture.”

“After a few weeks of talking, he sent me a track he said he had started that was specifically built off his inspiration of what he had seen,” he continued. “I immediately fell In love with it. He had already built most of it, but it was only a draft. Once I had the stems I pretty much broke the entire track down part for part, revamped the samples, and rebuilt the entire track with my added touch, extended and finished it. Due to his 2013 passing, he unfortunately would never get to hear the finished product. This track is his dedication to the ballroom culture and mine to him.”

Meet the stars of New York’s ballroom community in THUMP’s Vogue Nights documentary, and after that revisit the predictably impeccable mix MikeQ was kind enough to do for us in 2014.

QWEENDOM will be out this Friday, August 12, and is currently available for pre-order.

Follow Alexander on Twitter.

MikeQ Shares Archival Collaboration With Legendary House Vocalist Romanthony On New Single

Album art courtesy of the label

New Jersey producer MikeQ has shared the third single from his ballroom label Qween Beat‘s hotly anticipated debut compilation Qweendom, and it’s something of a once-in-a-lifetime treat. “Get Sum” finds Michael Cox sharing a collaboration with legendary house vocalist and producer Romanthony that was begun while he was still alive, and completed after his death in 2013. The singer is perhaps most famous for his work on Daft Punk’s “One More Time,” and Cox expertly works with his voice here by integrating vintage-styled synths and sampling techniques with his own signature approach to high-impact arrangement. In that way it carries a real aura of timelessness, which is more than appropriate for for the intergenerational exchange it represents.

“I want to say I started talking to Anthony in 2011; we had a mutual friend DJ MaryMac in New Jersey who is also currently Madonna’s tour DJ,” said MikeQ to The FADER in an interview. “After he emailed me, I learned that he frequently popped into the live Vogue Knights stream I had going around that time, and he then let me know how inspired he was by the culture.”

“After a few weeks of talking, he sent me a track he said he had started that was specifically built off his inspiration of what he had seen,” he continued. “I immediately fell In love with it. He had already built most of it, but it was only a draft. Once I had the stems I pretty much broke the entire track down part for part, revamped the samples, and rebuilt the entire track with my added touch, extended and finished it. Due to his 2013 passing, he unfortunately would never get to hear the finished product. This track is his dedication to the ballroom culture and mine to him.”

Meet the stars of New York’s ballroom community in THUMP’s Vogue Nights documentary, and after that revisit the predictably impeccable mix MikeQ was kind enough to do for us in 2014.

QWEENDOM will be out this Friday, August 12, and is currently available for pre-order.

Follow Alexander on Twitter.

Qween Beat's Byrell The Great Gives JX Cannon's "Gagged" A Mechanically Minimal Remix

Release art courtesy of the label

NYC imprint Sweat Equity boss, JX Cannon, has turned to Qween Beat-affiliated ballroom producer Byrell The Great for a mechanically minimal remix of “Gagged,” off of his forthcoming Tanked EP. Pairing back the hardcore-indebted bombast of the original, Byrell’s take is sleek, precisely calibrated, and luxuriant in its rhythmic striationbuilding power and a sense of aura more through careful arrangement than full-tilt overdrive.

“The first time I saw Byrell was in the basement of the now defunct Lit Lounge,” said JX Cannon to THUMP via email. “We’ve played together at parties like Bounce Gallery and Hot Action, and he always slays his sets. I was so excited he agreed to do a remix for the EP!”

Tanked/Gagged will be inaugurate Loveless Records‘ new sub-label Materia, available July 8 on Bandcamp and June 15 in stores.

Recently, JX Cannon got together with Fake Accent/Shottas founder Tygapaw for a scorching B2B ahead of NYC’s first Spice Ball. That wasn’t before he produced that viral Jersey club Obama remix though.

Follow Alexander on Twitter.