Dixon Tops RA's 2016 Readers Poll For The Fourth Year

Photo by Maarten Kadiks

For the fourth year in a row, German producer Dixon has won Resident Advisor’s annual readers’ poll of the top 100 DJs of 2016, published today.

Glasgow’s Jackmaster came in second place, followed up in third by Berlin-based duo Tale of Us; other artists in the top ten include Hessle Audio co-owner Ben UFO, Drumcode founder Adam Beyer, and Spain-based DJ Maceo Plex.

Chicago diehard The Black Madonna charted at number ten, a huge achievement considering that she only charted at all for the first time last year, at number 37. For the occasion, she shared a heartfelt message via Instagram this morning.

THUMP released our list of the top 20 mixes of 2016, and it features everyone from Earl Sweatshirt to DJ Haram, saving the top spot for The Black Madonna’s four-and-a-half hour B2B set with Mike Servito for the As You Like It podcast.

Follow Alexander on Twitter.

Dixon Tops RA's 2016 Readers Poll For The Fourth Year

Photo by Maarten Kadiks

For the fourth year in a row, German producer Dixon has won Resident Advisor’s annual readers’ poll of the top 100 DJs of 2016, published today.

Glasgow’s Jackmaster came in second place, followed up in third by Berlin-based duo Tale of Us; other artists in the top ten include Hessle Audio co-owner Ben UFO, Drumcode founder Adam Beyer, and Spain-based DJ Maceo Plex.

Chicago diehard The Black Madonna charted at number ten, a huge achievement considering that she only charted at all for the first time last year, at number 37. For the occasion, she shared a heartfelt message via Instagram this morning.

THUMP released our list of the top 20 mixes of 2016, and it features everyone from Earl Sweatshirt to DJ Haram, saving the top spot for The Black Madonna’s four-and-a-half hour B2B set with Mike Servito for the As You Like It podcast.

Follow Alexander on Twitter.

Maceo Plex Announces New Album, ‘Journey To Solar’

Photo courtesy of the artist

Following a successful Ibiza summer residency, Spanish producer and DJ Eric Estornel, aka Maceo Plex, announced today that a new album is on the way.

The new full-length, titled Journey to Solar, is due out on November 18 on his Ellum label. It follows his 2011 debut Life Index, and will serve as a prequel of sorts to another forthcoming album, Solar, scheduled for Spring 2017.

According to Estornel’s Facebook, both of the albums were written during the same period, and Journey to Solar is described as being “the tracks that didn’t make the album.” As Resident Advisor notes, it will consist of more club-friendly material compared to Solar‘s “mostly broken beat electro/electronica.”

Listen to samples of Journey to Solar below ahead of its November 18 release.

Maceo Plex Announces New Album, ‘Journey To Solar’

Photo courtesy of the artist

Following a successful Ibiza summer residency, Spanish producer and DJ Eric Estornel, aka Maceo Plex, announced today that a new album is on the way.

The new full-length, titled Journey to Solar, is due out on November 18 on his Ellum label. It follows his 2011 debut Life Index, and will serve as a prequel of sorts to another forthcoming album, Solar, scheduled for Spring 2017.

According to Estornel’s Facebook, both of the albums were written during the same period, and Journey to Solar is described as being “the tracks that didn’t make the album.” As Resident Advisor notes, it will consist of more club-friendly material compared to Solar‘s “mostly broken beat electro/electronica.”

Listen to samples of Journey to Solar below ahead of its November 18 release.

Watch Maceo Plex Attempt To Break The World Record For Most DJ Sets In 24 Hours

Screenshot via YouTube

In July, Maceo Plex (aka Eric Estornel) played 10 different DJ sets within 24 hours across the island of Ibiza as part of his Mosaic by Maceo residency. The sets were also an attempt to break the world record for the largest number of DJ sets performed within a 24-hour time span. Now, video of Estornel’s attempt has been released.

Throughout the five-minute video, Estornel recalls why he attempted the record, his experiences at a number of different locations, and what he hopes to gain from the experience.

Macao Plex’s journey took him from cliff sides to beaches to “super underground” venues seemingly in the middle of nowhere. “Es Vedra was emotional, because something about that big rock and the view was incredible,” Estornel said in the video about the second location on his journey. Throughout his attempt, he tried to play music that characterized each spot. “I did my best to capture the places that I was at, but I feel like I can learn a lot more from the island,” he said.

He also said the world record was a chance to connect with the people and the music of the island. “In my immediate future, as well as in the distant future, I want to do more things that kind break me out of the formula, day-to-day, music-making type of routine,” Estornel said.

Watch the video below.

Watch Maceo Plex Attempt To Break The World Record For Most DJ Sets In 24 Hours

Screenshot via YouTube

In July, Maceo Plex (aka Eric Estornel) played 10 different DJ sets within 24 hours across the island of Ibiza as part of his Mosaic by Maceo residency. The sets were also an attempt to break the world record for the largest number of DJ sets performed within a 24-hour time span. Now, video of Estornel’s attempt has been released.

Throughout the five-minute video, Estornel recalls why he attempted the record, his experiences at a number of different locations, and what he hopes to gain from the experience.

Macao Plex’s journey took him from cliff sides to beaches to “super underground” venues seemingly in the middle of nowhere. “Es Vedra was emotional, because something about that big rock and the view was incredible,” Estornel said in the video about the second location on his journey. Throughout his attempt, he tried to play music that characterized each spot. “I did my best to capture the places that I was at, but I feel like I can learn a lot more from the island,” he said.

He also said the world record was a chance to connect with the people and the music of the island. “In my immediate future, as well as in the distant future, I want to do more things that kind break me out of the formula, day-to-day, music-making type of routine,” Estornel said.

Watch the video below.

Maceo Plex Aims To Play Most DJ Sets Ever Performed Within 24 Hours

Photo courtesy of the artist

Hot on the heels of Nigerian DJ Obi shattering the world record for longest DJ set with a grueling 10-day marathon, Miami’s own Eric Estornel, aka Maceo Plex, is looking to create a record of his own.

Read more: Seven Times DJs Broke Guinness World Records

Under the banner of his ongoing Ibiza residency, Mosaic by Maceo, the Ellum label head has announced his forthcoming attempt to play the most DJ sets within a 24-hour period. On Tuesday, July 26, Estornel will perform ten sets at ten spots across the island, with each set a different genre from the last. On Facebook, he writes the reasoning behind this game-plan is to “capture the essence of Ibiza musically and visually” while also showcasing Mosaic’s M.O.: “Different kinds of music that fit into one idea of journey or piece of art.”

Fans who will be in Ibiza on the day of the feat are encouraged to send the Mosaic by Maceo Facebook page a private message to enter to win one of five spots to tag along with the crew.

Only in its debut season, Mosaic by Maceo perked ears upon its announcement earlier this year. Inspired by UK producer Steve O’Sullivan, whose Mosaic label is the residency’s namesake, Estornel publicized an emphasis on booking artists who aren’t your everyday Ibiza fare. The summer program at Pacha includes DJ sets from Barnt, Conforce, and Matrixxman; label showcases from Live At Robert Johnson and Permanent Vacation; and live performances from Gold Panda, Kiasmos, and Fatima Yamaha.

Maceo Plex Aims To Play Most DJ Sets Ever Performed Within 24 Hours

Photo courtesy of the artist

Hot on the heels of Nigerian DJ Obi shattering the world record for longest DJ set with a grueling 10-day marathon, Miami’s own Eric Estornel, aka Maceo Plex, is looking to create a record of his own.

Read more: Seven Times DJs Broke Guinness World Records

Under the banner of his ongoing Ibiza residency, Mosaic by Maceo, the Ellum label head has announced his forthcoming attempt to play the most DJ sets within a 24-hour period. On Tuesday, July 26, Estornel will perform ten sets at ten spot across the island, with each set a different genre from the last. On Facebook, he writes the reasoning behind this game-plan is to “capture the essence of Ibiza musically and visually” while also showcasing Mosaic’s M.O.: “Different kinds of music that fit into one idea of journey or piece of art.”

Fans who will be in Ibiza on the day of the feat are encouraged to send the Mosaic by Maceo Facebook page a private message to enter to win one of five spots to tag along with the crew.

Only in its debut season, Mosaic by Maceo perked ears upon its announcement earlier this year. Inspired by UK producer Steve O’Sullivan, whose Mosaic label is the residency’s namesake, Estornel publicized an emphasis on booking artists who aren’t your everyday Ibiza fare. The summer program at Pacha includes DJ sets from Barnt, Conforce, and Matrixxman; label showcases from Live At Robert Johnson and Permanent Vacation; and live performances from Gold Panda, Kiasmos, and Fatima Yamaha.

The Peculiar Sadness Of Going To A Music Festival Alone: A Photo Essay

I’ve never been good at making commitments. I can hardly finish a novel, let alone agree to attend a five-day music festival in a foreign country. But after spending a non-refundable $619.22 for six nights at a hotel approximately 0.6 miles away from the entrance to Barcelona’s Primavera Sound Festival, I was fully committed.

I arrived in Barcelona directly after a ten-day solo-trip in London, riding high off of British nightclubs, love affairs, and countless meat pies. What kept me going was the prospect of seeing some amazing bands like Radiohead, LCD Soundsystem, and the freshly reunited Avalanches across three consecutive days in the fresh, Balearic air. I also should note that I’m at a point in my life where the stressful parts of the festival experience have begun to outweigh the exciting ones. Read: I’m more concerned with wearing comfortable shoes than making sure my outfit is photogenic, or that my hair is freshly washed. Still, it seemed like it would be well worth it to power through my post-UK bender exhaustion for another handful of daysor so I believed.

Primavera Sound, which ran June 1-5 this year, was one of the most well-planned and strictly organized festivals I’ve ever attendedso much so that I had to ditch those friends of mine who weren’t able to enter daily through the separate and mandatory press check-in area, and whom it would be hard to link up with anyway, because they didn’t have texting or data plans in Spain. I decided to do the festival in honor of myself, and to focus on seeing the music I wanted to see, rather than staying close to my incommunicado compadres in a sea of tens-of-thousands.

It wasn’t an easy decision to make, and in some ways it flew in the face of knowledge I already had, which is that being solo in a place that’s intended for social interaction can be extremely lonely and torturous. It’ll be a great experience, I thoughtI live by myself, have been voluntarily single for years, and party-hop solo in New York just about every weekend, so how would this be any different? Still, it was a way of putting whatever self-sufficiency I thought I had to the test.

I had hoped that LCD Soundsystem, who have been my favorite band since I saw them live during my freshman year of college, would provide sufficient companionship with their headlining set on Thursday night. Sadly, my experience during their set was lackluster. I once again bailed on my friends in order to enter the press pit to take what I hoped would be legendary photos, only to be told by security that I was on the wrong side of the pit and couldn’t enter. There was no way in hell was I about to spend the first half of LCD’s set clawing my way past thousands of Europeans and other tourists just to get into the press pit, so instead I stayed put and sang along, alone. I thought about how I wished the bass was turned up to the level I’d become accustomed to, thanks to nightclubs in NYC. They played “New York I Love You, But You’re Bringing Me Down,” and I cried a little. My photos sucked.

The following day, I approached the correct side of the press pit to take some shots of Radiohead, and was told that my camera equipment was not professional enough to enter. I thought the security guard was kidding. “I am a professionalhave you heard of VICE?” was all I could think of saying. Despite my persuasive nature and charm, I was not granted access. So I spent another legendary musical performance distraught, singing alone to “Creep” while intermittently chatting with an adorable boy next to me who spoke in an accent I could hardly understand, aside from, “What a lovely track, yeah?” And a lovely track it was, but I felt so fucking alienated from it all.

Later that evening, Maceo Plex closed out the night with an outdoor set. People were dancing on each other’s shoulders and shuffling to strobe lights as Maceo spun intense techno underneath the sun rising from the east. This time, I took in the music surrounded by the friends I’d lost touch with earlier, and the feeling of being with them at a multi-stage festival in a foreign country was unmatched glory. I even had some company to walk my tired-ass up the stairs and out the festival exit once it ended, and watch me devour an entire personal pepperoni pizza on the sidewalk at 6:00AM. If I did that alone I would be a sad-sack, right?

The relief I experienced when reuniting with my drunken friends made me realize something: we live in an age where sharing experiences with your friends is something routine, be it in person or on social media. Going solo to Primavera Sound left me without a source of external validation, with no one to acknowledge that I’d really seen these acts I’d waited years to see, except for my Snapchat followers. Call me a product of my environment, but I’ve been molded, and so have you. I spent more time questioning why I couldn’t break that mold and enjoy my alone time at the festival than I did simply listening, observing, and reveling in it all.

Thatcompounded by a UK-related hangover, potential quarter-life millennial crisis, and missing some guycaused my photos of the festival to reflect something of a despondent mood, focusing on the shapes and colors found at Primavera Sound rather than the music and the crowd. They say good art raises your state of consciousness, so if you find yourself questioning your habits and overall existence after viewing this gallery, I’d consider it a win.

Sara Wass is a VICE staffer and NYC-based (actual) photographer and writer. Check out more of her work here.

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