Stream Lee Foss's New Single “Till The Light,” With Infinity Ink

Photo courtesy of Lee Foss.

On Friday, Lee Foss released his new single, “Till The Light” featuring his frequent collaborator, Infinity Ink. The single comes from Foss’s upcoming debut full-length album, Alchemy.

The track is a funky, upbeat, disco-influenced jam full of analog synths and catchy vocals perfect for the dance floor. Foss has been at work on Alchemy since 2015 and the album is scheduled for release on February 17.

Stream “Till the Light” below. Last week, we spoke to Foss about his earliest memories DJing at Avalon in Hollywood.


Stream Lee Foss's New Single “Till The Light,” With Infinity Ink

Photo courtesy of Lee Foss.

On Friday, Lee Foss released his new single, “Till The Light” featuring his frequent collaborator, Infinity Ink. The single comes from Foss’s upcoming debut full-length album, Alchemy.

The track is a funky, upbeat, disco-influenced jam full of analog synths and catchy vocals perfect for the dance floor. Foss has been at work on Alchemy since 2015 and the album is scheduled for release on February 17.

Stream “Till the Light” below. Last week, we spoke to Foss about his earliest memories DJing at Avalon in Hollywood.


Here’s Why Lee Foss Thinks What Happens In The Club Stays In The Club

Photo courtesy of Lee Foss.

Hot Creations label owner, DJ and producer Lee Foss plays in clubs across the globe to packed rooms full of fans eager for a diverse, house-heavy set. But before Foss made a name for himself around the world, he moved to Los Angeles and played regular sets at AVALON, the mega nightclub in Hollywood.

Here, Foss reminisces about the weirder moments during those early DJ sets and how he learned “what happens in the club, stays in the club.”

Before I was travelling as a DJ, I moved to LA from Chicago and became a local opener for other DJs. I would say I played once a month at Avalon.

I think any place that tries to be open a few nights a week for a couple thousand people to make it filled will have a couple of weird stories and that was Avalon.

Most people who go to clubs have a “what happens in the club, stays in the club” attitude unless someone’s sick. Most people are out to enjoy themselves. As long as they’re safe and healthy, it’s good. With the possible exception of people getting jealous and getting into fights, people tend to stay out of each other’s business unless they’re unwell.

Lots of random things would happen in the space.

Avalon is a big room and usually you DJ on the stage, but a couple of times when I DJed there, they’d turn the room around. The seating would move to the other side of the room, to make it different or interesting.

One night, the club flipped the DJ booth to the other side to where the seating is normally located. At one point, I looked to my right and two people were having sex in the club at 3:30 a.m. and no one was stopping them. It was right out in the open.

Even just the logistics of people having sex and doing it in a public space, in that space, was one of the weirdest things I’ve seen.

Me and my friends who were DJing that night were pointing and laughing at first, but I guess part of Avalon’s charm at the time was that no one was really paying attention to what anyone else was doing.

And about eight years ago, there was this dance that large groups of older people would do called “The Washing Machine.” They would take loads of drugsI think probably ecstasyand they would shake each other like a washing machine.

You’d see a group of them grab each other by the shoulders and dance in these big circles. They’d go back and forth, pulling each other really hard, while they stared off to the ground to get some sort of physical effect off of the drugs.

They were some pretty old people in the club, like people in their 50s doing this sort of washing machine dance.

That was a strange time because they had a weird mix of house and techno fans and this strange drug subculture. It was a big space, so they had to fill it.

I hadn’t gone backI hadn’t been there in about seven years and then I played there earlier this year. I hadn’t been there since I started touring. I headlined there. I had a great time.

I’ve got a good sense of humor. Probably the only thing that distracts me as a DJ is people either really inebriated or unaware they’re trying to take up your time at an inopportune time to get a picture. I think stuff like thatnot accepting that you’re a being and you have feelings or being inebriated and not respectful of your time and your spacethat’s distracting. But people having a good time … if you can’t laugh at it, even if it’s weird or it’s gross, then you’re not going to be able to laugh at life.

Lee Foss, Desert Hearts, And More Rally For Chicago Benefit Festival One City

Image via the One City Facebook event page.

A new festival is coming to Chicago, and it’s bring a cause along with it. Local dance music event promoter Paradigm has teamed up with Collaboractiona local theater company exploring critical social issuesto produce One City, a benefit festival for raising “awareness and funds to unify and increase the peace in Chicago,” according to the Collaboraction website.

Scheduled to take place on Saturday, August 6 at Space Stage Studios, One City will host performances from local peace activists and musicians, in addition to some side theater. Chicago-born producer Lee Foss, Anabel Englund, and local house stalwart, Gene Farris, top the newly-released lineup, which also features Southern California’s Desert Hearts crew.

“I’m a proud Chicagoan and always will be and also have been blessed to have all the opportunity in the world,” Foss told THUMP over email. “The current violence in my hometown cuts me to the core, these are deeply entrenched social issues married to a complete institutional dysfunction and the sooner everyone starts to take part in the dialogue and contribute their time, money and energy the sooner the city can start to heal and work on these social issues. When i was offered the opportunity to perform at a fundraiser/festival to give something back I jumped at the chance as it’s an issue that really hits close to home for me and that I hope all Chicagoans can all roll up our sleeves and at least try to to do our part to help.”

An invitation to One City can be acquired with a $20 donation, and donations of $100 or more grants a VIP ticket. All proceeds go to Collaboraction’s Peace of the Solution campaign, which supports the company’s Peacebook festival and other annual programming. View the lineup below and donate here.

Lee Foss' New Single Started As A Poem, Then Turned Into A Sunbeam

Lee Foss‘ productions over the last decade and a half have been lessons in casual optimism, a demonstration of the way to craft giddiness out of just a few intersecting synth lines and an insistent kick drum. His new single, “The Gift,” due this Friday on Emerald City, is similarly concerned with bliss, but its beginnings are far from the dancefloor.

In an email to THUMP, Foss explains that the lyrics of the tracksung acrobatically by the New Jersey-based Camille Safiyabegan as a poem to his girlfriend. But sensing the life in the lines (“Have I told you yet you’re sweet to me?” awwwwww) he enlisted Safiya to spin it into a clubby sunbeam, adorned by a few simple electronic bleeps and a loping drum shuffle. Like with most of his tracks, giving it a spin is sure to induce a smile, but this one even more so, knowing the roots are so cute.

Listen here in advance of its June 24 release, which will also feature remixes from Sonny Fodera, Lee Curtiss, and Detlef.

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