False Witness Will Release A New EP, 'The Art Of Fighting,' This Month

Photo of False Witness by Karla Xeno

Producer and #KUNQ co-founder False Witness will release his latest EP, The Art of Fighting, on GHE2G0TH1K March 28.

In anticipation of the new EP, the producer released a new DJ mix which previews the new EP. The mix premiered on March 10 on Know Wave.

In addition to tracks from artists such as Leonce, Kala and 8ULENTINA, the 17-track, club-ready mix includes three banging False Witness originals toward the end. It’s definitely worth a listen.

Stream False Witness’ Know Wave mix below. In December, Brooklyn-based imprint Mixpak release its annual holiday bundle, which featured new work from False Witness.

Kala Pairs Unremitting Claustrophobia With Club-Ready Thrills On His New EP

Photo by Hayden Schwartz

Brooklyn producer Jaryd Velez, a.k.a. Kala, today shared his seething new L.O.T.O (Liberation of the Oppressed) EP, hot on the heels of a pair of notable contributions to recent Mixpak and Club Chai compilations. Containing samples of Tupac, Lumidee, and Black Panther Party co-founder Bobby Seale, the release finds the Fake Accent and KUNQ-affiliated artist pairing themes of urgent political engagement with an ambiance of unwavering claustrophobia. Overall, the self-released record is particularly attuned to the hauntingly ephemeral use of negative space, but it still has its fair share of club-ready thrills.

What are some of the themes and ideas you wanted to explore on L.O.T.O? Why is club music a good space for this project?
For L.O.T.O I wanted to explore quite a few themes and elements. Some of them include empowerment, rage, love, and Carribean culture, all with a touch of social commentary.I think club music is a good space because the genre has crossed over to so many different genres and outlooks that are open to experimentation. People in the scene are quite vocal and aware of social issues, also, so it makes sense to fuse them together.

You’re affiliated with both the Fake Accent and the KUNQ collectives. Can you tell us about what your relationships with them?
My relationships with the crews are both bound by a love of music. I originally met False Witness and Rizzla a couple years ago back, through our mutual support of tracks. I was then introduced to Tygapaw after attending Fake Accent almost two years ago. After developing relationships with each crew, I was asked to join and I’m truly honored.

How did you first get into what could loosely be described as the “Brooklyn club music scene”? I know you grew up listening to hardcore, reggaeton, and Jersey/Baltimore club.

After seeing Jersey and Baltimore expand, Brooklyn is right next door, so I would drive over to shows on the weekend. The initial intro was through the internet first though, and it got deeper when I became friends with people in real life after moving.

On top of being an artist, you’re also an audio engineer. How does that technical training affect the way you approach your own productions?
Audio engineering taught me to be minimal in my production and strategize long term organization. I also take into account mixing and mastering which I do on my own, so the skills prepare me for each stage of the song process.

L.O.T.O will be released yesterday; you can get it on Bandcamp now.

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Panteros666 Unleashes A "Post-Hardstyle" Heater On Casual Gabberz' Essential New Compilation

Album art courtesy of the label.

Casual Gabberz is a Parisian collective of musicians leading the charge for a new, international gabber scene. Founded in 2013, the group releases hybrid club tracks that weave in gabber and rave, updating that screeching, no-fucks-given hardcore sound, as they put it in a press release, “for the internet age.” In 2014, the collective also organized GABBER EXPO in Paris, the first international exhibition about gabber culture (and the only music conference I could see myself having a good time at). Similar to collectives like Gabber Eleganza in Italy, KUNQ in New York, and Wixapol SA in Poland, Casual Gabberz also throws their own gabber-fueled parties, inviting old-school hardcore DJs like Rotterdam Terror Corps and Bass D to play alongside newer-gen acts like Teki Latex, Krampf, and Feadz.

On February 17, Casual Gabberz is releasing a blockbuster compilation called Inutile de Fuir (the title, according to my shoddy knowledge of French, roughly translates to “It’s Useless to Run Away”). Available as a double CD, free digital download (YAS!), and special boxset, these 40+ tracks also serve as Casual Gabberz’ musical manifesto, showing off the hybrid new gabber sound that they’ve been incubating over the past four years. Artists like Kilbourne, Panteros666, Canblaster, and Voiron were tasked with creating original tracks inspired by “hard” genres like hardcore, gabber, doom, trance, hardstyle, and jumpstyleand judging from the number of plays I’ve clocked up in the last few weeks, it bangs.

Below, we’re premiering “Planet 50/50” by Club Cheval member Panteros666, who pairs trance’s saccharine synths with pitched-up baby vocals straight out of a happy hardcore track and kick-in-your-face drums. He creates a jittery “post-hardstyle” club banger that wouldn’t be out of place on a GHE20G0TH1K dancefloor.

An Entire Generation of Dutch Children Was Ruined by Gabber

“Panteros666 has been one of our first supporters and became through the years a great friend. He played at our parties many times and took us for a legendary trip to his hometown at the border of France and Belgium and brought us to a party at Le Cap’tain, a club where the gabber culture is still vibrant/vibing,” the Casual Gabberz collective told THUMP in a statement.

As for Panteros666, he remarked, “Gabber is definitely something I want people to discover. The energy, pace and production technique is very refreshing. There are so many subgenres in gabber, the room for sonic and exploration is limitless. So here’s one of my post hardstyle hybrids. The track has a quirky organic groove in a meta technological environment, it’s my tribute to Manu Kenton, a hardstyle pioneer from my Euroregion. It goes up and down, grows dark and rises again, in that exhilarating hardstyle roller-coaster ride type of club structure.” Check it out below.

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Download Mixpak's Exclusive-Packed 2016 Holiday Bundle

Release artwork courtesy of the label

Brooklyn-based imprint Mixpak shared its annual holiday bundle of exclusive tracks this morning, and it features new work from #KUNQ co-founder False Witness (as Junior Makina), Endless affiliate 5TARBO1 (formerly known as Lexxi), and XL Records-signed producer GIL. The collection clocks in at 13 tracks long, and features all previously unreleased music.

Along with the aforementioned artists, it also highlights the work of some up-and-coming producers who are a little less well known. Brooklyn’s Epic B follows up their stellar Riddims From the Gods Vol.1 mixtape from earlier this year with the FDM (flex dance music) track “Whine,” while Fake Accent and #KUNQ producer Kala channels the first wave of dubstep on “Keep On.”

Last year’s Mixpak Holiday Bundle featured work from the likes of Florentino, MM, and Kid Antoine.

The compilation is out now, and available to download from Mixpak’s website.

Mixpak Holiday Bundle 2016 tracklist:

1. Mixpak Sound System Dub
2. firaasbeats – RIPLR
3. Epic B – Whine
4. GIL – Take Sand
5. Orlando Volcano – We Come 1
6. Svani & Mina – Hexacorallia (Mina Remix)
7. Mr. Mitch – The Man Waits (Nahshi Edit)
8. GAIKA – PMVD feat. Mista Silva (5TARB01 Remix)
9. Hoodcelebrityy – The Takeover (Kelman Duran Remix)
10. Junior Makina vs Visionist – Dembow 2 Brexit
11. Maceo x King Doudou – Nextel Funk
12. C.Z. – Turn the Tide Remix
13. Kala – Keep On

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Download Mixpak's Exclusive-Packed 2016 Holiday Bundle

Release artwork courtesy of the label

Brooklyn-based imprint Mixpak shared its annual holiday bundle of exclusive tracks this morning, and it features new work from #KUNQ co-founder False Witness (as Junior Makina), Endless affiliate 5TARBO1 (formerly known as Lexxi), and XL Records-signed producer GIL. The collection clocks in at 13 tracks long, and features all previously unreleased music.

Along with the aforementioned artists, it also highlights the work of some up-and-coming producers who are a little less well known. Brooklyn’s Epic B follows up their stellar Riddims From the Gods Vol.1 mixtape from earlier this year with the FDM (flex dance music) track “Whine,” while Fake Accent and #KUNQ producer Kala channels the first wave of dubstep on “Keep On.”

Last year’s Mixpak Holiday Bundle featured work from the likes of Florentino, MM, and Kid Antoine.

The compilation is out now, and available to download from Mixpak’s website.

Mixpak Holiday Bundle 2016 tracklist:

1. Mixpak Sound System Dub
2. firaasbeats – RIPLR
3. Epic B – Whine
4. GIL – Take Sand
5. Orlando Volcano – We Come 1
6. Svani & Mina – Hexacorallia (Mina Remix)
7. Mr. Mitch – The Man Waits (Nahshi Edit)
8. GAIKA – PMVD feat. Mista Silva (5TARB01 Remix)
9. Hoodcelebrityy – The Takeover (Kelman Duran Remix)
10. Junior Makina vs Visionist – Dembow 2 Brexit
11. Maceo x King Doudou – Nextel Funk
12. C.Z. – Turn the Tide Remix
13. Kala – Keep On

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Abdu Ali Revamps His Summer Empowerment Anthem 'Did Dat' With An Eclectic Remix EP

Photo by Keem Griffey

Baltimore club producer and Kahlon party curator, Abdu Ali, has followed up his acclaimed MONGO mixtape with the U DID DAT SUMMER CLUB PACK, which THUMP is thrilled to exclusively stream today. Featuring remixes from Qween Beat affiliate Quest?onmarc, KUNQ member Kilbourne (who blew us away with her recent Sourland EP), and Bmore stalwart DJ Juwan, the release is built around standout MONGO cut “Did Dat,” produced by Mighty Mark.

The styles on display range from minimal, viscerally kinetic vogue (Quest?onmarc) to metal-sampling shredder club (Kilbourne), and all-in-all highlights some of the most exciting young producers in US underground. For the premiere, we got to interview Ali via email, where we talked about how the original track functions as a celebration of Black Americans’ social and cultural legacy, the ways MONGO‘s success affected his relationship to Baltimore club, and how his Kahlon party generates physical and metaphysical liberation.

THUMP: Why did you want to do this remix EP? What made you want to work with these collaborators specifically?
Abdu Ali: I never thought of it being a remix EP but I guess it is! lol. When “DID DAT” came about on MONGO, I imagined it to be that summer turn up song of the tape. You know every album or body of music must have a track that’s purely for people to be lit to and “DID DAT” is that and in my opinion every dance single needs to be remixed. So I had it remixed by those who I admire coming up in today’s music scene. DJ Juwan is from Baltimore and is the quintessential Baltimore club DJ. His remixes take me back to the dance moments I had in the infamous Paradox club. Kilbourne is supreme bae and not only do I admire her strength to own her identity but also in her music. She gives you that punk hardcore club shit and I wanted her spin on the track. She calls her remix a “planet core” edit. Quest?onmarc is that new new bitch and his vogue club remixes are too nasty, so I had to get him to cut up on a track.

What was the creative process like for making the original version of “DID DAT”? How did the track come about?
Well me and Mighty Mark met up in the studio with the phrase “I DID DAT” already in my head. I sung it for him and he just started making the beat for it as I was spitting while the rest of the lyrics came out of me. I told him I wanted to sound like the throwback classic Baltimore Club music: minimal, hard hitting, and soulful. The knock in the track hits so consistently, as if it’s reaffirming the phrase “I DID DAT”. It’s one of my fav tracks on the project and for me it’s a self-congratulating empowerment song inspired by the contributions of Black Americans to society and culture, not just in past history but on a daily basis.

MONGO received a lot of critical praise from a range of publications, from politically far-left to more mainstream. What was that reception like for you, and how, if at all, has it affected your artistic practice going forward?
I gagged. I believed in the project but I never could expect so much love and praise for MONGO. I know it was good and I knew it would affect much more folk than past projects cause I made it with the intent to make it universal but geesh it sure did get a lot of love. But one of the most surprising things the reception provoked within me was the motivation to keep Baltimore Club music going and to take ownership of that, my culture, and make sure it doesn’t die with out its proper dues. It’s immediately lovable, it’s cathartic, it’s powerful, it’s very black, and this project made me realize that the next project needs more of it.

Who are some of your favorite artists working today? Are there any scenes or collectives you feel a particular kinship with?
I loved working with DJ Haram on MONGO. She is a genius and the supreme bae. Like I know her mental musical library is on some deep culturally expansive shit just based on the flavor of her sounds. Our musical auras go well together and we make FIYA transcendental music. I also love connecting with Mighty Mark who is also a bae but he gets how that old Baltimore club should be revitalized and transformed without losing the classic vibes of it. As far as collectives go I fucks with the BK baes, Papi Juice cause no shade they the only party I’ve been to in NYC in the past five years that made me feel worthy and powerful and people are actually dancing. I love what the art young black art queenz are doing from people like 3 Dot Zine to Aurel Haize Odogbo to Kimberly Drew. I also fuck with my loves BaltiGurls, a storming and legendary black and brown womyn arts collective who are changing the landscape of artistic public platforms like exhibiting art to throwing parties in the DMV.

How would you describe your Kahlon party to someone who had never heard of it?
Kahlon is a party that not only provokes physical liberation, being an inclusive space full of underrepresented but powerful identities not only in the audience but also on the stage, is empowering, making it a party and music event that is also metaphysically liberation. It’s a moment.

Cover art by Ghostdrank

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