Nightwave Asserts Her Boss Status on New ‘Wavejumper’ EP

“I was born to be an awesome motherf*cker,” begins the chorus of “Awesome,” the opening track of Glaswegian DJ-producer Nightwave‘s new Wavejumper EP. The track sets the mood for the artist (born Maya Medvesek), who over six raucous, rave-y tracks asserts her dominance with the cheeky force of a synth stab.

Considering her body of work, Medvesek’s unwavering confidence comes as no surprise. She began DJing at 15 and has been making music since 2010 (first as 8Bitch before assuming the Nightwave alias in 2011), with releases on labels including Fortified Audio, Unknown to the Unknown, and her own Heka Trax label. She also throws the ‘Nightrave’ club night, is a Red Bull Music Academy alum, and works to empower women through DJ workshops. Even when Internet haters piled on with harsh, sexist commentary during her Boiler Room performance last summer, she gave it right back to them:

Wavejumper‘s release tomorrow (April 14) will see Nightwave make the biggest stride yet in her career. The EP marks her debut on Fool’s Gold, the popular label headed by Nick Catchdubs and A-Trak. It features MCs Rye Rye, Chippy Nonstop, and Rell Rock, all of whom deliver rad, assertive verses over her bass-heavy production.

“I’m so excited to present [the] Wavejumper EP on Fool’s Gold—big fan of the label and it was my ideal choice for this release,” Medvesek tells THUMP over email. “I wanted to make something fun and energetic that works for any environment but still has a bit of an old rave vibe to it. The main inspiration for this record is my hometown of Glasgow: it’s a serious party town and I love the ‘everything goes’ musical approach people have here. Very happy to also have three amazing MCs on the EP—Rye Rye, Rell Rock and Chippy Nonstop—so pleased with their vocals and the energy they bring to the record. Last but not least, the artwork by Simone Noronha is the bomb.”

Listen to Nightwave’s Wavejumper EP below ahead of its release tomorrow, April 14, on Fool’s Gold.

This 11-Hour Glasgow Party Is Going Down In Total Darkness

Inside The Glue Factory, via the official website

A new party series in Glasgow is giving clubbers the kind of blackout that won’t leave them hungover the next morning.

As reported by Synth Glasgow, local promoter Animal Farm are launching Blackout, a new club series that aims to totally immerse attendees by erasing their sense of time and place. How do they plan to achieve this? By keeping everything pitch black over the course of its 11-hour duration, and also by moving to another venue partway through.

The party, which features performances from Dax J, Abdulla Rashim, Somewhen, and Stephanie Sykes, will kick off at 4pm inside arts venue and workspace The Glue Factory before heading to Joytown Grand Electric Theatre, an old snooker hall that Animal Farm’s Quail describes as ” like a real seedy, underground joint from Glasgow’s past; still quite raw.”

“We plan on keeping things pretty pitch-black in terms of production and musical programming,” Quail said. “Having an early start, we want to transfer what we do in a club environment to a venue with no natural light, allowing the clubber to immerse themselves in the experience and forget about the outside world.”

Aside from the immersive experience, Quail also emphasizes that the 11-hour length is about pacing oneself through the night rather than trying to cram everything into a few hours, which he says often leads to people already over their limit before leaving the house. “With Blackout, we aim to change the clubbing mentality a little to perhaps mirror that of the continent, where having more time equates to spreading the party out a little and focusing more on the music and experience rather than getting into a stupor and forgetting you were even out.”

The Best Things We Saw On The Dance Music Internet This Week

Art installations at Day For Night 2016. Photo by Greg Noire.

Every week, we round up a list of our favorite videos, stories, mixes and other dance music-related news from our own site and other places across the internet. Here’s our list. We think you’ll enjoy it. And don’t forget to check out our Seven Most Played tracks, which features Dawn Richard, Anthony Naples, Abra, and more.

1. How to throw a DIY rave

In this Guide to Life, we teach you everything you need to know about throwing your own rave, from finding a venue and supplying alcohol to acquiring a guest list and handling the cops. You’ll want to bookmark this one.

2. Algorave

It’s like a codeathon, but for electronic music. Kind of. Sort of. And it’s awesome.

3. Texas: the new EDM capital

Oneohtrix Point Never plays at Day For Night 2016, in Houston. Photo by Julian Bajsel.

It’s not as strange as you think. Writer Jeff Gage explains why the Lone Star state is embracing EDM at full force.

4. A guide to underground electronic music in Mexico

The oqko collective created this guide to the best elements of Mexico’s underground electronic music stars. It’s up now at CLASH and it’s worth your time.

5. Jamiroquai return

After a very long hiatus, 90s funk band Jamiroquai return with a new sound, new video and new album. Check out the video for “Automaton” above.

6. Remembering Mark Fisher

100% Silk artist Maria Minerva reflects on Fisher, a music critic, cultural theorist and her former professor at Goldsmith’s.

7. The 9 best synth shops in the U.S.

We break down the best shops to purchase and play with synths across the country.

8. Clubbing with care

Our friends at i-D spent time in Glasgow to meet the socially-conscious clubgoers and promoters turning the scene on its head.

9. Nightlife and adulthood

I don’t need to conform to some staid linear maturation. I’m going to live forever, aren’t I?

Do you have to choose between loving nightlife and embracing adulthood? Our pals in the UK investigate.

10. They Call it Acid


Watch the trailer for a new documentary, They Call it Acid, on the birth and rise of acid house.

Get To Know The Label Who's Bringing The Most Exciting Artists In Glasgow Together Right Now

This post ran originally on THUMP UK.

“It’s no secret that the weather here, is atrocious.” Andrew Thomson is talking about the microclimate the envelopes Scotland’s second city. He’s run his label, Huntleys + Palmers, in and out of Glasgow since 2007 with the intention of bringing “the artists and DJ’s who excited me to the city for the first time.” Yet it wasn’t until H+P’s first release in 2011Auntie Flo’s Goan Highlife 10″caused a stir, that things started to look up for the imprint.

Bold, statement releases from the likes of SOPHIE and Alejandro Paz followed, making it clear that H+P wasn’t going to be a run of the mill-house operation. With their stature growing, Thomson was keen forge ideas of interconnectivity and inclusion within the citysomething that Glasgow is already famous for. Venues like the Green Door Studios have long been creative hubs for musicians and artists to explore in a collaborative manner, and that sense of kinship strikes me as important to Thompson, H+P, and the acts that circulate around it.

“When planning our Boiler Room session, I faced a dilemma…I wanted to use it as a platform to showcase as much of Glasgow’s talent as possible,” Thomson told me. “So while not being able to feature everyone on the broadcast itself, I came up with the compilation idea.”

The result was Clyde-Built, a 22 track overview of everything innovative and interesting made in Glasgow in early 2016. Featuring, amongst other treats, avant-YMOpop by Joe Howe, Italia90’s Baikal-deep house, and some good old fashioned art school detachment courtesy of the fantastically named Modern Institute, Clyde-Built was, and is, a great overview of a city that’s having something of a renaissance at the moment.

He’s decided to round off the year in by releasing Clyde-Built 2.0, another fantasticand fantastically oddrun-through the city’s musical outer limits. Inside you’ll find club music, disjointed house, and even some Life Without Buildings heartbreak shamble-pop by my new favorite band Still House Plants. Listening to it, you can’t help but imagine that London, with its vastness, its inability to read itself as a totality, could never produce such a diverse but succinct statement of intent.

Thompson, who’s spent time living in London, seems slightly damning of the place. “I was really taken aback when I moved to Londonthe lack of decent venues for a city of its size was quite striking,” he says. “This was back in 2010 and I don’t need to add any more inches to the ‘woe is London nightlife’ columns, but let’s put it this way: eight million more people live in London, and Glasgow has the same amount of decent clubs that I would happily go to/play at on a weekend as London does. Which I think speaks to more about the vibrant scene in Glasgow than it does London…”

But you know what? Fuck London. Let’s leave London out of this. To really get to grips with what’s going on north of the border, we spoke to a few of the producers featured on Clyde 2.0. Now, if you need us, we’ll be on a Megabus…

MR TC

As MR TC, Thomas Lea Clarke produces music that sits somewhere between La Dusseldorf, Suicide, and Nitzer Ebb; disturbed cosmic surf jams for basement dwelling insomniacs. Clarke’s released two EPs on Optimo Music, plays live with a four piece band, and throws the much-loved Night of the Jaguar parties down at the Art School.

THUMP: How did you come to work with the Huntleys + Palmers guys?
MR TC: I met Andy at a night at the Art School when he moved back up to Glasgow. After that we ended up seeing each other around at a lot of things and I’d always go to H+P nights so we got to know each other. At some point he sent me a message about contributing a track to the first Clyde-Built comp and that was that.

Is Glasgow a city where there’s a real strong sense of cohesion and collaboration amongst musicians?
I think the size of Glasgow means that it’s very easy for people to know everyone that’s in the scene. You get plenty of new projects starting up all the time and with things like the supergroups course at Green Door, interesting collaborations always seem to be happening.

Where do you feel you fit into the Glasgow scene?
Maybe somewhere in the crossover between electronic/club/techno/house/etc scene and the guitar/band/gig scene. I run club nights and DJ at the Art School but we’ll often have punk bands playing amongst DJs and I make electronic music that’s tinged with Krautrock and psychedelic guitar music. I also work a day job as a booker for a rock venue.

What’s the ideal night out in the city?
Every now and then you get these incredible nights where you feel like everyone you know is there, the club will be great and there’ll be a great after party that people end up talking about for ages.

Finally, what’s Glasgow’s best kept secret?
Green Door Studio!

Cucina Povera

Photo by David Boyson Cooper. Maria Rossi is one of the more experimentally-minded producers featured on Clyde-Built 2.0. Her material as Cucina Povera (which translates loosely as an Italian concept of peasant cooking) is sparse and spectral, eldritch incantations for the dispossessed. Alongside Daniel Magee, she’s also part of H+P staple Luxos. She hosts a show (Between the Acts) on the city’s Subcity Radio.

THUMP: Can you tell us what brought you and H+P together?
Cucina Povera: I initially got involved with the scene through DJing at Subcityinterweaving vinyl records with spoken word and weird field recordingsand subsequently through Green Door’s projects aimed at developing young people’s musicianship skills. Thanks to material created within this realm, H+P got in touch to release a track I co-wrote and co-produced for Luxos, a collaborative project with Dan Magee of Lo Kindre.

Is Glasgow as collaborative as it seems?
I feel as though “the scene” can be quite insular and self-serving, so unless you already have a foot in the door it can seem insurmountably intimidating to try and put material out there, to try and play gigs. But I have been fortunate enough to have lived in the city for a while, and so I have been able to get involved with projects that have helped me grow.

Do you fit into what’s going in the city? And does that matter?
I feel like a bit of an oddball chancer; I don’t have fancy equipment and I cycle to gigs with my set-up in a backpack. I work with found stuff and chance encounters as the name Cucina Povera evokes. When it comes to music, I work with what I find in the cupboard, or on walks around the citywithin the dual paradigm of precarity and serendipity.

What’s the best way to spend a night out there?
The ideal night out is a wander through the Necropolis at pitch dark, equipped with a torch, a portable recorder, cigs and a flask of mulled Bucky.

Tell us the city’s best kept secret.
Glasgow’s best kept secret is the putrid spectre of the water treatment plant at Kelvin Hall, and other, vaguely less smelly, more convivial waterway spirits inhabiting the nooks and crannies of Glasgow’s rivers, ponds and locks.

Hammer

Most THUMP readers will be familiar with Rory Hamilton through his work with Belfast bruisers Bicep, with whom he’s released a trio of heavy-hitting house records on their very own Feel My Bicep imprint. Hamiltonwho works at Sub Clubhas also, like half the city, released material on Optimo Music. “CSX1,” his contribution to Clyde Built 2.0 is a spacey rumbler, suitably indicative of Hamilton’s ability to blend whomp and whoosh with aplomb.

THUMP: What was your first run in with Andrew?
Hammer: Andrew has been a good friend for years, and that began when I started running nights in Glasgow around 2008. H+P was always an inspiration for me, from the bookings, to the artwork, to the general vibe, plus Andy always gave me lots of advice on various things that I didn’t have a clue about. More recently he lived with me for a year, overhearing a lot of the music I was making from my bedroom studio, which was the catalyst to get me involved with the label. One of my tracks actually inspired the first Clyde Built comp, but never made it on!

Is there a community spirit in Glasgow?
For me this couldn’t be more true, with Andy supporting me when I was starting my first parties, Optimo supporting and releasing my first ever solo EP, and also collaborating with artists such as General Ludd and Hi & Saberhagen. Everyone gets along and supports each other, which I am sure is common in a lot of vibrant cities. Glasgow is quite small and it has so many producers and musicians, so it’s really easy to go round to a friends place in the evening and record some music. It’s also a very social place, and from my experience a lot of people are wanting to work together. Green Door studio is another example of this, it runs funded music programmes that bring people together in an amazing way; bands like Golden Teacher were formed there and Optimo are constantly releasing music from the projects that go on there.

Do you think that what you do equates to the wider city scene?
I’ve never really thought about this, and I’m not sure how I feel about placing myself in a scene. What I would say is that there is a lot people who love to have fun and also really appreciate quality underground electronic music. Some of the people contribute creatively and some just enjoy it and participate. I’d like to think I do both.

What’s your ideal night out in Glasgow?
Starting on Friday evening: Tabac for a few drinks, Sub Club, after party, a few more pubs (Distill, Chip or The Drake), back to Sub Club for Harri & Dom, after party. That’s generally how things go.

Finally, what’s Glasgow’s best kept secret?
Everyone is pretty upfront so there’s not too many secrets left.

Wheelman

Photo by Ewan McQuillan

Stereotone is a party and label on the rise, and it’s run by a dude who calls himself Wheelman. Their ethos is simpleall they want is a night with good music for good people, and, frankly, who could ask for more? When he’s not running those nights, or releasing tunes by the likes of Bleaker, he’s making tunes like “Bus It,” a Bobby Caldwell sampling woozy-banger for the pissed-up and broken-hearted.

THUMP: So, Wheelman and H+P. What’s the backstory?
Wheelman: Was really straightforward, big bossman Andrew got in touch and asked if I had anything I’d want to contribute to the compilation. I’d been a fan of the label for years and the last Clyde Built was great so I was happy to be involved!

Is Glasgow a city where there’s a real strong sense of cohesion and collaboration amongst musicians?
In certain circles definitely, in others not so much; just like anywhere really. I’ve got a handful of close friends who make music and they give me feedback on what I do and vice versa but I wouldn’t say we have a cohesive style, we all do things pretty differently and I think we’re better off for it.

Do you feel like you’re part of any scene in particular?
It’s quite hard to say really. I quickly became friends with loads of different people in Glasgow when I started going out regularly but the way licensing laws are in the city (with clubs shutting at 3AM), as well as there being so many DJs and artists, makes it hard for newcomers to get warm up slots and prove themselves to people. So after a few years I decided to just do it myself and started up a club night (and now record label) called Stereotone which is, thankfully, still going strong and coming up for it’s second birthday!

What’s a good way to spend a Saturday night in Glasgow?
With good friends and good music.

What’s the big secret on everyone’s lips at the moment?
If someone is trying to keep a secret I don’t think they will have told me about it. If they did it wouldn’t be kept secret for very long.

HAUSFRAU

City-based artist Claudia Nova’s work as HAUSFRAU is deeply disquieting. 2014’s Night Tides is essential listening for anyone with even the slightest interest in Julee Cruise, shoegaze, and listening to minimal wave records very loudly in the dark, which, if we’re honest, should be most of you.

THUMP: How did you establish a working relationship with the label?
Hausfrau: I contributed a track of mine to the Clyde Built 2.0 Compilation. The first Clyde Built compilation was brilliant and showcased such a variety of underground Glasgow-produced talent, and I was really flattered to be asked to submit something.

Is Glasgow a city where there’s a strong sense of cohesion and collaboration amongst musicians?
I’ve only ever made music in Glasgow so I don’t know how it compares to other cities, but the musical community here seems pretty inclusive and supportive. There’s a lot of mutual appreciation across genres, as well as opportunities for newer musicians to work alongside more established acts. Nobody is unapproachable. The programs run by the Green Door Studio are responsible for lot of the most interesting creative collaborations in this city. There’s a good deal of crossover between the fields of music, visual art and performance due to festivals like Buzzcut, Glasgow International and Glasgow Film Festival. It was the latter that prompted a collaboration between Tut Vu Vu and myselfone of the tracks on Clyde Built 2.0 (“When Lovers Finally Meet”) was recorded as part of a commissioned performance at Paisley Abbey last year.

Do you feel like part of a broader scene at all?
I’m not sure if I do, but I prefer the freedom of being able to adapt and shift rather than occupying a fixed position.

How does one go about having the best night out possible?
This is a difficult question for me because I know a lot of individuals who work tirelessly to make Glasgow’s nightlife worthy of its legendary status and I feel like I’m betraying them by admitting that I don’t like going out very much. I feel anxious in crowded places and unnerved by high levels of background noise. That said, I’m not a complete hermitI do enjoy the odd gig at The Old Hairdressers or the Hug and Pint, or a screening at the CCA.

Are there any big secrets you want to let us into?
There are too many choices. I’ve lived here for almost 10 years and I’m still encountering new people and places. I don’t think it’s possible to get bored here. Maybe give me another 10 years.

Apostille

Photo by Joe Oremus

Night School Records is an imprint run by the prolific Michael Kaspiaris that’s played host to the likes of Divorce, The Space Lady, and Helena Celle. He makes music as the Apostille, and the Apostille material is a dark and damaged exploration of the farthest reaches of gutter-dwelling minimal EBM; a clanking, crawling mess of barely-there vocals, tin-can percussion, and crumpled Casio blurt. If you’re not interested in an album called Virile Strain Transmission then you’re pretty much beyond hope.

THUMP: What’s the backstory with you and Andy and the label?
Apostille: I’d been aware of them for ages. I think perhaps I heard of them through an artist I like called Mamacita. H+P approached me kind of out the blue and asked for a track for the compilation. The only thing I had was a demo I had for the next album which I was more than happy to let go.

Is Glasgow really that heavy on collaboration?`
Yes. It’s always been like that, I think. I lived in London for 10 years before moving back home and there’s definitely a different feel. I find it cheering that people are happy to work together and help each other here, often out-with a framework of capital and money. Perhaps because it’s a relatively small city, but things are more cohesive here: you get the same people going to hardcore punk shows, underground raves, independent cinema festivals. I think that’s healthy. People are very open and there are always new and interesting partnerships and collaborations springing up.

Where, if anywhere, do you feel you fit into the Glasgow scene?
Ha, God knows! I’ve always had a low-grade chip on my shoulder which I’ve been slowly growing out of, it’s comforting to be an outsider sometimes. The reality is I’ve been around long enough to know quite a few people in Glasgow who make things. I think I’m probably smack bang in the middle of being naive and excited enough with the music I make not to be jaded but also I’m active enough in putting records out and putting gigs on to be, I hope, some sort of help for people traveling to the city to play and also new people trying to make music. I’m probably completely self-deluded though.

Sell us the ideal night out in the city?
For me, making no plans, or very few. Food in Mono, Paseano, Dining Inn, Yadgar, Ranjit’s Kitchen (though not all of them in the same night), maybe a gig in The Old Hairdressers or Sleazy’s or someone’s house, a drink in the Laurieston, or Heraghty’s, maybe stumble upon The Modern Institute/Golden Teacher crew and their sound system in a tunnel or dancing in someone’s house. The likelihood is I’ll probably be putting a gig on and stressing about turn out if I’m being honest.

Go on…what’s Glasgow’s best kept secret?
No matter how many times you fuck up, it always forgives you.

Clyde Built 2.0 is out now on Huntleys + Palmers

Josh is on Twitter

Jackmaster Opens Ramen Restaurant In Glasgow

Photo via Jackmaster’s Facebook

Scottish DJ Jackmaster has opened up a ramen restaurant in his hometown of Glasgow, according to an announcement on his Facebook page.

The restaurant, Ramen Dayo (which translates from Japanese to “This is ramen”), was founded in partnership with Numbers co-founder Paul Beveridge and label-affiliate Spencer. As its Facebook page explains, the idea was born of Beveridge’s 11 years living in Tokyo, where he became “obsessed” with the popular noodle dish, eating it several times a week as he explored the city’s best spots. In 2014, he returned to Glasgow and, lamenting the lack of places to enjoy his favorite food, began the two-year project, which included “cooking for friends at home, researching recipes, and trawling through the internet in Japanese.”

Ramen Dayo is located at 9 Gordon Street, where it is open from noon until 10 PM every day. In addition to ramen, the restaurant also serves gyoza, sak, and Japanese cocktails.

Jackmaster Opens Ramen Restaurant In Glasgow

Photo via Jackmaster’s Facebook

Scottish DJ Jackmaster has opened up a ramen restaurant in his hometown of Glasgow, according to an announcement on his Facebook page.

The restaurant, Ramen Dayo (which translates from Japanese to “This is ramen”), was founded in partnership with Numbers co-founder Paul Beveridge and label-affiliate Spencer. As its Facebook page explains, the idea was born of Beveridge’s 11 years living in Tokyo, where he became “obsessed” with the popular noodle dish, eating it several times a week as he explored the city’s best spots. In 2014, he returned to Glasgow and, lamenting the lack of places to enjoy his favorite food, began the two-year project, which included “cooking for friends at home, researching recipes, and trawling through the internet in Japanese.”

Ramen Dayo is located at 9 Gordon Street, where it is open from noon until 10 PM every day. In addition to ramen, the restaurant also serves gyoza, sak, and Japanese cocktails.

Get To Know The Label Who's Bringing The Most Exciting Artists In Glasgow Together Right Now

This post ran originally on THUMP UK.

“It’s no secret that the weather here, is atrocious.” Andrew Thomson is talking about the microclimate the envelopes Scotland’s second city. He’s run his label, Huntleys + Palmers, in and out of Glasgow since 2007 with the intention of bringing “the artists and DJ’s who excited me to the city for the first time.” Yet it wasn’t until H+P’s first release in 2011Auntie Flo’s Goan Highlife 10″caused a stir, that things started to look up for the imprint.

Bold, statement releases from the likes of SOPHIE and Alejandro Paz followed, making it clear that H+P wasn’t going to be a run of the mill-house operation. With their stature growing, Thomson was keen forge ideas of interconnectivity and inclusion within the citysomething that Glasgow is already famous for. Venues like the Green Door Studios have long been creative hubs for musicians and artists to explore in a collaborative manner, and that sense of kinship strikes me as important to Thompson, H+P, and the acts that circulate around it.

“When planning our Boiler Room session, I faced a dilemma…I wanted to use it as a platform to showcase as much of Glasgow’s talent as possible,” Thomson told me. “So while not being able to feature everyone on the broadcast itself, I came up with the compilation idea.”

The result was Clyde-Built, a 22 track overview of everything innovative and interesting made in Glasgow in early 2016. Featuring, amongst other treats, avant-YMOpop by Joe Howe, Italia90’s Baikal-deep house, and some good old fashioned art school detachment courtesy of the fantastically named Modern Institute, Clyde-Built was, and is, a great overview of a city that’s having something of a renaissance at the moment.

He’s decided to round off the year in by releasing Clyde-Built 2.0, another fantasticand fantastically oddrun-through the city’s musical outer limits. Inside you’ll find club music, disjointed house, and even some Life Without Buildings heartbreak shamble-pop by my new favorite band Still House Plants. Listening to it, you can’t help but imagine that London, with its vastness, its inability to read itself as a totality, could never produce such a diverse but succinct statement of intent.

Thompson, who’s spent time living in London, seems slightly damning of the place. “I was really taken aback when I moved to Londonthe lack of decent venues for a city of its size was quite striking,” he says. “This was back in 2010 and I don’t need to add any more inches to the ‘woe is London nightlife’ columns, but let’s put it this way: eight million more people live in London, and Glasgow has the same amount of decent clubs that I would happily go to/play at on a weekend as London does. Which I think speaks to more about the vibrant scene in Glasgow than it does London…”

But you know what? Fuck London. Let’s leave London out of this. To really get to grips with what’s going on north of the border, we spoke to a few of the producers featured on Clyde 2.0. Now, if you need us, we’ll be on a Megabus…

MR TC

As MR TC, Thomas Lea Clarke produces music that sits somewhere between La Dusseldorf, Suicide, and Nitzer Ebb; disturbed cosmic surf jams for basement dwelling insomniacs. Clarke’s released two EPs on Optimo Music, plays live with a four piece band, and throws the much-loved Night of the Jaguar parties down at the Art School.

THUMP: How did you come to work with the Huntleys + Palmers guys?
MR TC: I met Andy at a night at the Art School when he moved back up to Glasgow. After that we ended up seeing each other around at a lot of things and I’d always go to H+P nights so we got to know each other. At some point he sent me a message about contributing a track to the first Clyde-Built comp and that was that.

Is Glasgow a city where there’s a real strong sense of cohesion and collaboration amongst musicians?
I think the size of Glasgow means that it’s very easy for people to know everyone that’s in the scene. You get plenty of new projects starting up all the time and with things like the supergroups course at Green Door, interesting collaborations always seem to be happening.

Where do you feel you fit into the Glasgow scene?
Maybe somewhere in the crossover between electronic/club/techno/house/etc scene and the guitar/band/gig scene. I run club nights and DJ at the Art School but we’ll often have punk bands playing amongst DJs and I make electronic music that’s tinged with Krautrock and psychedelic guitar music. I also work a day job as a booker for a rock venue.

What’s the ideal night out in the city?
Every now and then you get these incredible nights where you feel like everyone you know is there, the club will be great and there’ll be a great after party that people end up talking about for ages.

Finally, what’s Glasgow’s best kept secret?
Green Door Studio!

Cucina Povera

Photo by David Boyson Cooper. Maria Rossi is one of the more experimentally-minded producers featured on Clyde-Built 2.0. Her material as Cucina Povera (which translates loosely as an Italian concept of peasant cooking) is sparse and spectral, eldritch incantations for the dispossessed. Alongside Daniel Magee, she’s also part of H+P staple Luxos. She hosts a show (Between the Acts) on the city’s Subcity Radio.

THUMP: Can you tell us what brought you and H+P together?
Cucina Povera: I initially got involved with the scene through DJing at Subcityinterweaving vinyl records with spoken word and weird field recordingsand subsequently through Green Door’s projects aimed at developing young people’s musicianship skills. Thanks to material created within this realm, H+P got in touch to release a track I co-wrote and co-produced for Luxos, a collaborative project with Dan Magee of Lo Kindre.

Is Glasgow as collaborative as it seems?
I feel as though “the scene” can be quite insular and self-serving, so unless you already have a foot in the door it can seem insurmountably intimidating to try and put material out there, to try and play gigs. But I have been fortunate enough to have lived in the city for a while, and so I have been able to get involved with projects that have helped me grow.

Do you fit into what’s going in the city? And does that matter?
I feel like a bit of an oddball chancer; I don’t have fancy equipment and I cycle to gigs with my set-up in a backpack. I work with found stuff and chance encounters as the name Cucina Povera evokes. When it comes to music, I work with what I find in the cupboard, or on walks around the citywithin the dual paradigm of precarity and serendipity.

What’s the best way to spend a night out there?
The ideal night out is a wander through the Necropolis at pitch dark, equipped with a torch, a portable recorder, cigs and a flask of mulled Bucky.

Tell us the city’s best kept secret.
Glasgow’s best kept secret is the putrid spectre of the water treatment plant at Kelvin Hall, and other, vaguely less smelly, more convivial waterway spirits inhabiting the nooks and crannies of Glasgow’s rivers, ponds and locks.

Hammer

Most THUMP readers will be familiar with Rory Hamilton through his work with Belfast bruisers Bicep, with whom he’s released a trio of heavy-hitting house records on their very own Feel My Bicep imprint. Hamiltonwho works at Sub Clubhas also, like half the city, released material on Optimo Music. “CSX1,” his contribution to Clyde Built 2.0 is a spacey rumbler, suitably indicative of Hamilton’s ability to blend whomp and whoosh with aplomb.

THUMP: What was your first run in with Andrew?
Hammer: Andrew has been a good friend for years, and that began when I started running nights in Glasgow around 2008. H+P was always an inspiration for me, from the bookings, to the artwork, to the general vibe, plus Andy always gave me lots of advice on various things that I didn’t have a clue about. More recently he lived with me for a year, overhearing a lot of the music I was making from my bedroom studio, which was the catalyst to get me involved with the label. One of my tracks actually inspired the first Clyde Built comp, but never made it on!

Is there a community spirit in Glasgow?
For me this couldn’t be more true, with Andy supporting me when I was starting my first parties, Optimo supporting and releasing my first ever solo EP, and also collaborating with artists such as General Ludd and Hi & Saberhagen. Everyone gets along and supports each other, which I am sure is common in a lot of vibrant cities. Glasgow is quite small and it has so many producers and musicians, so it’s really easy to go round to a friends place in the evening and record some music. It’s also a very social place, and from my experience a lot of people are wanting to work together. Green Door studio is another example of this, it runs funded music programmes that bring people together in an amazing way; bands like Golden Teacher were formed there and Optimo are constantly releasing music from the projects that go on there.

Do you think that what you do equates to the wider city scene?
I’ve never really thought about this, and I’m not sure how I feel about placing myself in a scene. What I would say is that there is a lot people who love to have fun and also really appreciate quality underground electronic music. Some of the people contribute creatively and some just enjoy it and participate. I’d like to think I do both.

What’s your ideal night out in Glasgow?
Starting on Friday evening: Tabac for a few drinks, Sub Club, after party, a few more pubs (Distill, Chip or The Drake), back to Sub Club for Harri & Dom, after party. That’s generally how things go.

Finally, what’s Glasgow’s best kept secret?
Everyone is pretty upfront so there’s not too many secrets left.

Wheelman

Photo by Ewan McQuillan

Stereotone is a party and label on the rise, and it’s run by a dude who calls himself Wheelman. Their ethos is simpleall they want is a night with good music for good people, and, frankly, who could ask for more? When he’s not running those nights, or releasing tunes by the likes of Bleaker, he’s making tunes like “Bus It,” a Bobby Caldwell sampling woozy-banger for the pissed-up and broken-hearted.

THUMP: So, Wheelman and H+P. What’s the backstory?
Wheelman: Was really straightforward, big bossman Andrew got in touch and asked if I had anything I’d want to contribute to the compilation. I’d been a fan of the label for years and the last Clyde Built was great so I was happy to be involved!

Is Glasgow a city where there’s a real strong sense of cohesion and collaboration amongst musicians?
In certain circles definitely, in others not so much; just like anywhere really. I’ve got a handful of close friends who make music and they give me feedback on what I do and vice versa but I wouldn’t say we have a cohesive style, we all do things pretty differently and I think we’re better off for it.

Do you feel like you’re part of any scene in particular?
It’s quite hard to say really. I quickly became friends with loads of different people in Glasgow when I started going out regularly but the way licensing laws are in the city (with clubs shutting at 3AM), as well as there being so many DJs and artists, makes it hard for newcomers to get warm up slots and prove themselves to people. So after a few years I decided to just do it myself and started up a club night (and now record label) called Stereotone which is, thankfully, still going strong and coming up for it’s second birthday!

What’s a good way to spend a Saturday night in Glasgow?
With good friends and good music.

What’s the big secret on everyone’s lips at the moment?
If someone is trying to keep a secret I don’t think they will have told me about it. If they did it wouldn’t be kept secret for very long.

HAUSFRAU

City-based artist Claudia Nova’s work as HAUSFRAU is deeply disquieting. 2014’s Night Tides is essential listening for anyone with even the slightest interest in Julee Cruise, shoegaze, and listening to minimal wave records very loudly in the dark, which, if we’re honest, should be most of you.

THUMP: How did you establish a working relationship with the label?
Hausfrau: I contributed a track of mine to the Clyde Built 2.0 Compilation. The first Clyde Built compilation was brilliant and showcased such a variety of underground Glasgow-produced talent, and I was really flattered to be asked to submit something.

Is Glasgow a city where there’s a strong sense of cohesion and collaboration amongst musicians?
I’ve only ever made music in Glasgow so I don’t know how it compares to other cities, but the musical community here seems pretty inclusive and supportive. There’s a lot of mutual appreciation across genres, as well as opportunities for newer musicians to work alongside more established acts. Nobody is unapproachable. The programs run by the Green Door Studio are responsible for lot of the most interesting creative collaborations in this city. There’s a good deal of crossover between the fields of music, visual art and performance due to festivals like Buzzcut, Glasgow International and Glasgow Film Festival. It was the latter that prompted a collaboration between Tut Vu Vu and myselfone of the tracks on Clyde Built 2.0 (“When Lovers Finally Meet”) was recorded as part of a commissioned performance at Paisley Abbey last year.

Do you feel like part of a broader scene at all?
I’m not sure if I do, but I prefer the freedom of being able to adapt and shift rather than occupying a fixed position.

How does one go about having the best night out possible?
This is a difficult question for me because I know a lot of individuals who work tirelessly to make Glasgow’s nightlife worthy of its legendary status and I feel like I’m betraying them by admitting that I don’t like going out very much. I feel anxious in crowded places and unnerved by high levels of background noise. That said, I’m not a complete hermitI do enjoy the odd gig at The Old Hairdressers or the Hug and Pint, or a screening at the CCA.

Are there any big secrets you want to let us into?
There are too many choices. I’ve lived here for almost 10 years and I’m still encountering new people and places. I don’t think it’s possible to get bored here. Maybe give me another 10 years.

Apostille

Photo by Joe Oremus

Night School Records is an imprint run by the prolific Michael Kaspiaris that’s played host to the likes of Divorce, The Space Lady, and Helena Celle. He makes music as the Apostille, and the Apostille material is a dark and damaged exploration of the farthest reaches of gutter-dwelling minimal EBM; a clanking, crawling mess of barely-there vocals, tin-can percussion, and crumpled Casio blurt. If you’re not interested in an album called Virile Strain Transmission then you’re pretty much beyond hope.

THUMP: What’s the backstory with you and Andy and the label?
Apostille: I’d been aware of them for ages. I think perhaps I heard of them through an artist I like called Mamacita. H+P approached me kind of out the blue and asked for a track for the compilation. The only thing I had was a demo I had for the next album which I was more than happy to let go.

Is Glasgow really that heavy on collaboration?`
Yes. It’s always been like that, I think. I lived in London for 10 years before moving back home and there’s definitely a different feel. I find it cheering that people are happy to work together and help each other here, often out-with a framework of capital and money. Perhaps because it’s a relatively small city, but things are more cohesive here: you get the same people going to hardcore punk shows, underground raves, independent cinema festivals. I think that’s healthy. People are very open and there are always new and interesting partnerships and collaborations springing up.

Where, if anywhere, do you feel you fit into the Glasgow scene?
Ha, God knows! I’ve always had a low-grade chip on my shoulder which I’ve been slowly growing out of, it’s comforting to be an outsider sometimes. The reality is I’ve been around long enough to know quite a few people in Glasgow who make things. I think I’m probably smack bang in the middle of being naive and excited enough with the music I make not to be jaded but also I’m active enough in putting records out and putting gigs on to be, I hope, some sort of help for people traveling to the city to play and also new people trying to make music. I’m probably completely self-deluded though.

Sell us the ideal night out in the city?
For me, making no plans, or very few. Food in Mono, Paseano, Dining Inn, Yadgar, Ranjit’s Kitchen (though not all of them in the same night), maybe a gig in The Old Hairdressers or Sleazy’s or someone’s house, a drink in the Laurieston, or Heraghty’s, maybe stumble upon The Modern Institute/Golden Teacher crew and their sound system in a tunnel or dancing in someone’s house. The likelihood is I’ll probably be putting a gig on and stressing about turn out if I’m being honest.

Go on…what’s Glasgow’s best kept secret?
No matter how many times you fuck up, it always forgives you.

Clyde Built 2.0 is out now on Huntleys + Palmers

Josh is on Twitter

Glasgow Roof-Raisers Dixon Avenue Basement Jams Have Turned In A Raucous Guest Mix

When you start a label and sell it with the tag, “Real rockin’ raw shit from the street for the clubs,” you’ve really got to make sure you live up to it. Luckily for them, and us, Dixon Avenue Basement Jamsthe house and techno imprint run out of Glasgow by Dan Lurinsky and Kenny Grievehave done just that.

Founded in 2012, DABJ have fast become one of the most beloved and talked-about labels in the UK, and with releases from the likes of Marquis Hawkes, Denis Sulta and Big Miz enjoying serious club play, it’s not hard to see why. For those of us out there who like our dance records suffused with some serious grit, every new DABJ 12″ is a guaranteed pleaser. Which is why we asked Lurinsky and Grieve to knock together a mix for us.

The result is just as slamming as we’d anticipated. Check out both the mix and a quick chat with the lads below.

THUMP: Can you tell us a little about why you decided to start a label? Can you pin-point the moment or was it more of a gradual realisation that starting an imprint was the way to go?
Dixon Avenue Basement Jams: People (mostly friends) had been sending us unreleased music to play on radio shows and at gigs for a while, so we were sitting on music we thought had to be heard. That, coupled with spending too much time with our partners forced the birth of DABJ.

How do you contextualize DABJ? Who do you see yourselves in a lineage with?
As DJ’s, whether it be techno or house, we’ve always played upfront dancefloor orientated tracks from labels like Sonic Groove, Dance Mania, UR, Relief, Casual, Rephlex, and Viewlexx, so it was a natural progression for us to release artists that we would buy and play out ourselves had they been on another label. Your place in a lineage should probably come from someone other than yourself. People we respect or look to currently are folk like Creme Organization, Hypercolour, Numbers, White Material, Lobster Theremin, and Clone.

What exactly is it you’re looking for in new material from artists?
“Freaky,” “Acid,” “Weird,” “Banging,” “Daft,” “Filthy,” are all things you might hear us say if we like something.

Where do DABJ records work best?
Loud, dark places hopefully.

What’s on the horizon for the label?
Much of the same if we’re honest. More from Fear-E and Big Miz in the very near future along with some brand new stupidity from Norn Ironfrom a couple of different artists. Then a new, exciting venture with Denis Sulta and some straight up club bangers and ridiculously good acid from south of the border. A cheeky little collab with a flourishing Glasgow clothing brand would be nice, and more gigs in hot places please!

DABJ are on Facebook // SoundCloud // Twitter

Glasgow Roof-Raisers Dixon Avenue Basement Jams Have Turned In A Raucous Guest Mix

When you start a label and sell it with the tag, “Real rockin’ raw shit from the street for the clubs,” you’ve really got to make sure you live up to it. Luckily for them, and us, Dixon Avenue Basement Jamsthe house and techno imprint run out of Glasgow by Dan Lurinsky and Kenny Grievehave done just that.

Founded in 2012, DABJ have fast become one of the most beloved and talked-about labels in the UK, and with releases from the likes of Marquis Hawkes, Denis Sulta and Big Miz enjoying serious club play, it’s not hard to see why. For those of us out there who like our dance records suffused with some serious grit, every new DABJ 12″ is a guaranteed pleaser. Which is why we asked Lurinsky and Grieve to knock together a mix for us.

The result is just as slamming as we’d anticipated. Check out both the mix and a quick chat with the lads below.

THUMP: Can you tell us a little about why you decided to start a label? Can you pin-point the moment or was it more of a gradual realisation that starting an imprint was the way to go?
Dixon Avenue Basement Jams: People (mostly friends) had been sending us unreleased music to play on radio shows and at gigs for a while, so we were sitting on music we thought had to be heard. That, coupled with spending too much time with our partners forced the birth of DABJ.

How do you contextualize DABJ? Who do you see yourselves in a lineage with?
As DJ’s, whether it be techno or house, we’ve always played upfront dancefloor orientated tracks from labels like Sonic Groove, Dance Mania, UR, Relief, Casual, Rephlex, and Viewlexx, so it was a natural progression for us to release artists that we would buy and play out ourselves had they been on another label. Your place in a lineage should probably come from someone other than yourself. People we respect or look to currently are folk like Creme Organization, Hypercolour, Numbers, White Material, Lobster Theremin, and Clone.

What exactly is it you’re looking for in new material from artists?
“Freaky,” “Acid,” “Weird,” “Banging,” “Daft,” “Filthy,” are all things you might hear us say if we like something.

Where do DABJ records work best?
Loud, dark places hopefully.

What’s on the horizon for the label?
Much of the same if we’re honest. More from Fear-E and Big Miz in the very near future along with some brand new stupidity from Norn Ironfrom a couple of different artists. Then a new, exciting venture with Denis Sulta and some straight up club bangers and ridiculously good acid from south of the border. A cheeky little collab with a flourishing Glasgow clothing brand would be nice, and more gigs in hot places please!

DABJ are on Facebook // SoundCloud // Twitter

This Scottish Comedian's Bizarre Sketches About Partying Are Horrifyingly Accurate

You, every weekend, played by Limmy.

We’ve spoken time and time and time again about the murky underworld that is one’s living room the morning after a big night out. The air practically furry with cigarette smoke, your eyes stretched, the sun an unwelcome pale ghost, come to highlight just how too old for this you are now. By now the music’s some indiscriminate, indeterminate deep house mix that some v-neck bro none of you really know has put on and immediately fallen asleep to. This is the elephant’s graveyard; where all the fairy dust that’s been sparkling around everybody all night settles and turns to ash.

Think about this world for a bit too long and you’ll start to feel sickwith regret, and the numb inevitability that you will be doing the exact same thing in a fortnight’s time. Which is why I was left feeling sick, sick to the pit of my hairy little stomach, when Scottish sketch comedian Limmy released a brand new Party Chat last week.

If you haven’t seen or heard of Party Chat, then you probably haven’t seen Limmy’s Showmeaning there is also a high chance you haven’t heard of Limmy. For complete newcomers, Limmy is a comedian from Glasgow. He’s probably best described as a “cult comedian”shorthand for, his material is weird and most of his audience exists onlinebut for my mind, I can’t think of another comedian who speaks with such chilling accuracy of the world of crushed pills and half smoked cigs.

Feast on this, his latest offering:

That’s you that is. Rolling around in the same conversation like lukewarm, grey bath water for the best part of two hours, suddenly aware that you should have left this party a long time ago, but that now it’s reached 8AM you’ve basically got no choice but to lose yourself even further. It might just be a short video, it might literally only feature one actorLimmy from different anglesbut it is harrowingly real. It’s the same thing he did on the Party Chat skits from the original series, painting the debris of the afterparty that never really was. The intellectual wasteland you will spend the next week trying to forget. If anything, the cuts from the original series are even darker. The anonymous heads asleep in the corners, the weird slurred questions about Coronation Street, the tinny, pulsing music, the complete lack of atmosphere. I hate watching it, but I can’t stop.

Screen Shot 2016-09-28 at 10.51.34.png

Effectively, we have all spent time with this guy. It takes a certain kind of night, and a certain cocktail of drugs and chronic fatigue, to reach this point. He’s the central figure in every sketch, his eyes winding around the room like two marbles rolling off in opposite directions, his teeth sliding back and forth as though breaking the seal on an invisible Mars Bar wrapper. We have all known him, he has asked everyone one of us if we’ve had a good night, suggested to all of us we go and find a pub and keep going. He is the friend nobody quite recognizes, the friend everybody assumes came back with somebody else.

And if you don’t recognize him, then he’s probably you.

It’s probably because Glasgow has such an amazing after party culture, but you definitely get the feeling Limmy has been here countless times before. Not only that, but you get the feeling he’s been here before and come out the other side. Otherwise, it’s unlikely he’d ever admit this reality to himself. All of us, when we’re leaving the club and heading back to some living room somewhere in the opposite direction to where we live, paint a very different picture of what we’re heading back for. We trick ourselves into believing the party will only get better, the conversation fuller and the music more glorious. We tell ourselves this will be it, this will be what we’re waiting for. We tell ourselves, that guy must be somebody’s else’s mate.

It’s not all desolation and mumbled sentences, but the Party Chat sketches are a window into the side of the crack on we so often fail to talk about. The shit side, the ‘I should have gone home hours ago’ side, the so tired but so awake side. And maybe, in a few years, when they are fully behind me as well, I might even find them funny.

Angus is on Twitter.

Glasgow Nightspot Sub Club Finally Responded To Social Media Safe Space Criticism

It only took four days of online uproar, accusation and rapidly increasing anger, but Sub Club managed to put out a statement yesterday in response to criticism regarding their use of the term ‘safe space’. It’s been a tumultuous few days.

A quick recap. The origins of the controversy lie in a post from the legendary Glaswegian venue’s official Twitter account last Friday, heralding the club’s credentials as a safe space, since “1987” (the year Sub Club opened, obviously). What was intended as a uneventful assertion of woke credentials by an eager social media manager quickly erupted into full-scale shitstorm.

A swell of incredulous users pointed out that, contrary to the earnest meme, they had been assaulted, groped and made to feel generally unsafe on the club’s dance floor. This led to a fraught debate one Twitter and a resulting piece on the excellent A Thousand Flowers site, who anointed the club their Weekly Wanker, alongside previous luminaries such as Stefan King. In all earnestness, Subby have had better weeks.

As ill-advised as the initial comments might have been, it was the tenor of the club’s response to the criticism that properly ignited the debate. Bluff, unwieldy and tone deaf, it ran at a slightly surreal angle to the sentiments expressed in the safe space post. One Twitter user who’d previously worked at the venue put forward that it wasn’t just revellers that felt unsafe. Despite being “a big fan of subby,” the tweet ran, ‘”I (and multiple friends) were groped there regularly 2006-2012 sooooo”. The club’s official account response (“you worked at sub, are a friend and know us personally. You never once mentioned this to us or stewards as far as we know?”) displayed, according the A Thousand Flowers post:

“zero fundamental understanding of how the culture around sexual violence works to silence those affected, particularly women, (as) they’re just straight up victim-blaming. How can you trust a club that declares itself a safe space but won’t even reflect on what people are telling them about their experiences there?”

Which would seem like the appropriate time to issue an apology, reflect that legitimate concerns have been raised and maybe just acknowledge that the crassness of the initial response doesn’t exactly read particularly brilliantly, at best. Would have been a start wouldn’t it? Hardly perfect, but a little sincere contrition never did any harm now, did it?

Sub Club revellers back in happier times (image via YouTube)

Well, the Subby social media bods seemed to have missed that particular memo. The increasingly bad tempered episode then migrated over to Facebook, with a post on Sunday night that appeared to link the criticism of its initial Twitter posts with the twin horrors of Jo Cox’s assassination and the Orlando massacre which claimed the lives of over 50 people. The status signed off with “It’s important never to be complacent in the face of deliberate and poisonous campaigns of misinformation,” with an accompanying clip of Heaven 17 track ‘(We Don’t Need This) Fascist Groove Thang.’

It’s really quite difficult to envisage a more spectacular deficit in self-awareness and surplus in self-importance for a pastime thatfor all the talk of transcendence and seamless ecstasyis essentially meaningless. If ever a week was to make that brutally apparent, then it was the week just passed. The response to the post was predictably, and utterly justifiably, one of revulsion.

It’s since been deleted and accompanied by the lengthy statement, apology and pledge to work on safety for attendees. The jury remains out whether it’s a case of too little, much too late for one of the UK’s most famous clubs.

You can read the apology in full, here.

Francisco is on Twitter

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