Entrevistamos a Setaoc Mass y Matrixxman acerca de cómo fue crear un álbum juntos

Figure, el sello de Len Faki, fue el anfitrión del álbum Pitch Black. El EP es una colaboción entre Matrixxman y Setaoc Mas que cuenta con cuatro temas; “Vortex”, “Reckoning”, “Second” y “Pitch Black”. Según reporta Bandcamp, Pitch Black es un extraño pero hipnotizante balance entre ” lo espacioso y lo claustrofóbico y lo moderno y lo clásico”.

Esta dicotomía sonora es de esperarse cuando se junta el sonido del estadounidense Charles Duff, (Matrixxman), quien es uno de los artistas contemporáneos más prometedores de techno futurista, con los sonidos del británico Sam Coates, Setaoc Mass, quien logra meter la impulsividad y la urgencia en tracks que atienden primero al detalle.

Los temas de Matrixxman han sido tocado por nombres como Rødhåd, Jeff Mills, Ben Klock, Richie Hawtin y ha estado afiliado a sellos como Dekmantel, Planet Rhythm, Delft y Ghostly International. Setaoc Mass por su lado tiene su propio sello, SK_eleven, ya ha estado afiliado al sello de Len Faki, y hace parte de un selecto grupo de artistas que están absorbiendo el legado del techno para re interpretarlo en el futuro.

A propósito de que dos artistas prometedores del techno se juntaran para crear el EP Pitch Black, quisimos hacerles algunas preguntas respecto al proceso de producción y otras cosillas varias. Si está interesado en el álbum, puede comprarlo por aquí.

¿Cómo se conocieron?

Ambos éramos fans mutuos, además de movernos por la misma frecuencia musical. Nos conectamos a través de Bandcamp de forma virtual, y luego en el Dekmantel en la vida real. El resto es historia 😉

¿Por qué decidieron bautizar como ‘Pitch Black al EP’?

Porque siempre que salíamos del estudio durante los meses de invierno el cielo siempre estaba oscuro.

De las cuatro canciones, ¿cuál fue la más dura de terminar?

-Setaoc Mass: “Second”; como era sumamente minimal, cada elemento y arreglo era clave para un buen sonido.

-Matrixxman: La cuarta canción [“Pitch Black”]. Tomó un par de revisiones antes de lograr acabarla.

¿Por qué resolvieron lanzar este EP con Figure?

-Setaoc Mass: ¡Una Buena casa para una buena música!

-Matrixxman: Tenía sentido teniendo en cuenta la afiliación que tiene Sam con el sello.

¿Quién pedía la comida durante el proceso de producción? ¿Cuáles solían ser sus comidas?

Ambos pedíamos comida, en especial la que consistía de mucho curry. Ocasionalmente también nos antojábamos de comida Coreana. Evitábamos cualquier cosa “occidental” porque hubiera podido afectar para mal nuestros sentidos del humor. También tomábamos cervezas, shots y cocteles para celebrar cada etapa del proceso: acabar una canción, salir de los pre masters y el lanzamiento final.

Recomiéndennos un álbum electrónico clásico y uno moderno

-Setaoc Mass: El Ten days of Blue de John Beltran y el 18 1/2 minute gaps de Turinn.

-Matrixxman: The Occurrence de Jeff Mills y Dead Cities de Future Sound of London.

¿Qué es lo más particular que encontraron del otro durante las sesiones de estudio?

-Setaoc Mass: La talentosa teoría musical de Charlie.

-Matrixxman: Sam tiene un oído excepcional para crear patrones interesantes de sintetizador y efectos en cadena. Cada uno tiene sus propias formas de hacer las cosas, así que fue muy cool observar los trucos de cada uno en acción.

¿Quién tiene la mejor cuenta de Instagram de los?

-Setaoc Mass: *No responde*

-Matrixxman: La de Sam, obviamente.

¿Podemos esperar una nueva colaboración en el futuro, de pronto un MatrixxMass?

Seguramente. Este EP fue divertido pero ya estamos maquinando algo un poco distinto. Algo más refinado y moderado pero con un toque psicótico. El primer álbum solo fue el ejercicio de rasguñar la superficie…

Zeno Amsel's "Sea Cucumber" is Dank and Squirmy Techno

Houston producer Zeno Amsel has shared a jittery new track off his upcoming debut EP on Lobster Theremin, Enzo Trax.

“Sea Cucumber” is pleasantly woozy techno that strikes an enervating balance of gnarled and crisp production values. Its unquantized bassline has a certain wiggling effect, which, paired with some dynamic knob twiddling in the harmonic mid-range, gives the track a compellingly squirmy quality.

The Texas artist told THUMP about the song’s psychedelically cosmic backstory over email. “I drew inspiration from the immense variety of forms in the universe,” he said. “I imagined dark, dank, no-name clubs where anonymous revelers embrace their identity as specs in the infinity of existence.”

Enzo Trax will be released on June 30, and is available for pre-order.

Follow Alexander on Twitter.

DJ Boring Shares Foggy Title Track from His Official Solo Debut

Following a string of well-received one-offs, including “Winona” and “Goodbye Michael,” London lo-fi house producer DJ Boring has shared the buoyant title track from his upcoming three-song release Sunday Avenue.

Out June 16 on Brooklyn imprint Let’s Play House, “Sunday Avenue” is a straightforward house beat in the vein of his previous work, pairing nostalgic vibes and a heavy dose of cotton-mouthed haziness.

Earlier this year, THUMP explored how YouTube’s related video algorithm helped artists like DJ Boring, DJ Seinfeld, and Ross From Friends get their start.

Listen to the single and check out a tracklist below.

Sunday Avenue Tracklist:

1. Sunday Avenue
2. 6 AM Mimosa
3. Tribal Dreams

Alexander Iadarola is on Twitter.

Russell Louder Is The Performance Artist Putting Eastern Canada's Electronic Scene On The Map

Photo courtesy of artist. This post ran originally on THUMP Canada.

What gives a song its “feel”? How can you detach from someone in a way that isn’t hurtful? How can you incorporate your audience into a performance without forcing them? These are the kinds of questions Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island-based musician and performance artist Russell Louder is sensitive to and asking, and the answers they’re finding are helping put them on the map in a Canadian city not known for its electronic music.

Growing up on the East Coast, Louder had the benefit of parents who played Laurie Anderson and Peter Gabriel around the house, while also learning guitar and getting classical training in voice. At 17, they moved to Montreal to work with their older brother, Leon, as an assistant at his recording studio. While Leon made everything from commercial soundtracks to experimental electronic music there, it wasn’t until a fateful stay in Iceland two years later that Russell began to write and record on their own.

Now after releasing a handful of songs on SoundCloud, which oscillate between structured, emotionally-direct pop and sprawling techno, Louder is gearing up for a busy 2017. Their first EP, the self-released, pop-focussed Think of Light, arrives this Saturday, while the more experimental and beat-driven Bridge will be released later this year via Montral-based label Unfulfillment.

Today, THUMP’s premiering “Never Lost” from the former, which could fit in a mix effortlessly alongside Canadian artists like Austra and Majical Cloudz. The track begins with a dark, melancholic groove, but it doesn’t take long for Louder’s voice to fill it with light. The words are personal, sung with a kind of croon over-top the anchoring, lithe mix. Have a listen below as you read our interview with the 21-year-old artist about their beginnings, the upcoming EP’s themes, and the queer community in PEI.

THUMP: So did you first start making electronic music in Iceland, or was that happening with your brother at his studio as well?

Russell Louder: I wasn’t making any music at my brother’s studio, I was doing stuff like music research. He would get the idea for a storyboard, and he would say “we need something that sounds like this, this, this and this, the theme of the commercial is this,” and he would send me off. I would spend hours a day surfing and researching music, and figuring out essentially what made a “feel.” So that was really interesting, being able to incorporate fragments of things and arrange them. Not in a plagiaristic way, but just literally copying the feel of something and understanding where that comes from, and why certain chord progressions make you feel this way and others make you feel another way. I didn’t start making music until Iceland, which was February 2015.

What did you have available to you in that studio space? What helped to inform the sounds you were working with?
When I was in Iceland, it was a really awful time, to be honest. It was really dark and I was in a really bad place, so the music is this really brutal ambient stuff. It was a shared studio space with five other bands, and I basically used my laptop. I had a Macbook Pro and started off with Garageband, and then that turned into using Logic. I would just use the microphone on my computerit was really jankyand I would put vocal filters on percussion and make melodies with the percussion. I wasn’t playing any instruments.

It was very conceptual, weird, kooky shit, but it was a really cool way to learn how to build a song. I created this project called Romeo Blue, which I would never show anybody now, because you could tell I was just figuring my shit out. It was funny because I come from a performance art and visual art background, and so I felt I couldn’t create a musical project without conceptualizing it first. Even though it was really bad Notre Dame Basilica for Encuentro in 2014 when I was 18. We had three initial performances where they were the developers of the project.

Abortion access has only become recently available in PEI, so before when it wasn’t available, we were holding protests. I was not involved with the legal or organizational grunt work apart from Scream Choir. There were several of these grassroots entities that came together via Abortion Access Now PEI to try to get our current provincial government to allow abortion access on island. There was one such protest happening, and I thought it would be amazing to do a Scream Choir. So I emailed Coral and Sarah, and asked for their permission to conduct and perform this Scream Choir in front of the Gentlemen’s Club in Charlottetown, and they said yes.

That wasn’t what got abortion access on PEI, but what did was a group of power femmes coming together and essentially threatening to sue the provincial government. Now we have a clinic in Somerset, but it’s just the beginning of the conversation. We need to talk about who’s working at this clinic, is it going to be a safe space, is it going to be trans-friendly, are the people working there wanting to work there and wanting to help, and not deter? But it’s a huge milestone. Change does happen on PEI, but you really have to work for it.

Michael Rancic is on Twitter.

High Klassified Takes Moby To A Montreal After-Hours With His "Natural Blues" Rework

High Klassified photo by Visually Tasteful

While he passed on DJing Donald Trump’s inauguration ball last month, Moby‘s been keeping busy recently, releasing the politically-charged video for his song “Erupt & Matter” (from the producer’s 2016 album These Systems Are Falling with The Void Pacific Choir) and winning accolades for his Los Angeles vegan restaurant.

For his latest EP, Black Lacquer, the electronic veteran’s teamed up with Fool’s Gold Records to have artists from the label rework a handful of his greatest hits. We’ve already Nick Catchdubs’ take on “Porcelain,” and today we’re premiering High Klassified‘s remix of “Natural Blues,” which originally appeared on Moby’s 1999 album Play.

Keeping the track’s memorable sample of American folk singer Vera Hall’s “Trouble So Hard” intact, the Montreal beatmaker adds a bouncy house backbone, making it perfect for warehouse after-hours or one of his infamous Laval house parties. “My mom used to listen to Moby when I was younger so doing this remix brought back memories,” High Klassified told THUMP via email.

Listen to it below and pre-order Black Lacquer here before it comes out Friday.

Black Lacquer Tracklist:

1. Go (Treasure Fingers Remix)
2. Why Does My Heart Feel So Bad? (Madeaux Remix)
3. Natural Blues (High Klassified Remix)
4. Porcelain (Nick Catchdubs Kaleidoscopic Mind Mix)

Max Mertens is on Twitter.

Nicola Cruz Regresa A Multi Culti Para Presentar 'Cantos De Visión' | US | Translation

Foto cortesa del artista.

El nuevo ao recibe a nuestro chamn ecuatoriano favorito con un nuevo y prometedor EP. Luego de participar en el compilado Moon Faze Sun Gaze III a mediados del pasado ao, Nicola Cruz regresa al sello canadiense Multi Culti para presentar Cantos de Visin, un trabajo compuesto por seis cortes en los que el artista andino ahonda en los terrenos del downtempo ms experimental.

Tracks como “Tzantza” han formado parte del acto en vivo de Cruz durante el ltimo ao, as que si tuviste la oportunidad de perderte en las tonadas selvticas del hombre, seguramente te conectars de inmediato con esta ltima pcima sonora. Escchalo a continuacin, y adquiere el EP a partir del 22 de enero, por ac.

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Take An Interstellar Late Night Swim With Roberto's "Lunar Waves"

Courtesy of artist

Known affectionately by many in Toronto’s house and disco scene as “Uncle Roberto,” DJ, producer, and proud cat owner Roberto (aka Robert Steekamer) has been a staple of the city’s underground community for over 20 years, deservedly earning a reputation amongst heads and partygoers alike as a selector with weight and no shortage of fire tracks.

In the past year, the artist has enjoyed a breakthrough internationally, with a string of well-received heaters on labels including NYC’s Good Timin’, Berlin’s Red Motorbike, and now, London’s No Bad Days. Lunar Waves is the imprint’s sophomore release, and Roberto shows he’s not hitting a slump any time soon, delivering four tracks of smooth and shimmering Balearic house grooves.

Though the eponymous title cut packs a bit more attitude than the rest of the EP, it still glistens with the same sunset vibes evident throughout. “Lunar Waves” begins with bassy acid lines before soothing pads come into the equation. As the song grows in momentum, the pads grow increasingly more euphoric, before arpeggiated bleeps and bloops and a closing ripper of a synth solo show up to add some spice.

“My process for ‘Lunar Waves’ and for pretty much the whole EP, was just to try and do something really melodic and smooth that could still hold up in a club setting,” Steekamer tells THUMP. “I’ve always loved that juxtaposition of having kinda mellow keys over tough drums.”

Listen to it below and pre-order the EP before it comes out Nov. 28 here.

Cindy Li is on Twitter.

Take An Interstellar Late Night Swim With Roberto's "Lunar Waves"

Courtesy of artist

Known affectionately by many in Toronto’s house and disco scene as “Uncle Roberto,” DJ, producer, and proud cat owner Roberto (aka Robert Steekamer) has been a staple of the city’s underground community for over 20 years, deservedly earning a reputation amongst heads and partygoers alike as a selector with weight and no shortage of fire tracks.

In the past year, the artist has enjoyed a breakthrough internationally, with a string of well-received heaters on labels including NYC’s Good Timin’, Berlin’s Red Motorbike, and now, London’s No Bad Days. Lunar Waves is the imprint’s sophomore release, and Roberto shows he’s not hitting a slump any time soon, delivering four tracks of smooth and shimmering Balearic house grooves.

Though the eponymous title cut packs a bit more attitude than the rest of the EP, it still glistens with the same sunset vibes evident throughout. “Lunar Waves” begins with bassy acid lines before soothing pads come into the equation. As the song grows in momentum, the pads grow increasingly more euphoric, before arpeggiated bleeps and bloops and a closing ripper of a synth solo show up to add some spice.

“My process for ‘Lunar Waves’ and for pretty much the whole EP, was just to try and do something really melodic and smooth that could still hold up in a club setting,” Steekamer tells THUMP. “I’ve always loved that juxtaposition of having kinda mellow keys over tough drums.”

Listen to it below and pre-order the EP before it comes out Nov. 28 here.

Cindy Li is on Twitter.

Scott Hardware’s 'Mutate Repeat Infinity' Is A Dance-Pop Meditation On Capitalism And Queerness

Album artwork courtesy of Banko Gotiti Records

Scott Hardware is the new synth-pop incarnation of Scott Harwood, who previously recorded as Ken Park. His new six-track EP, Mutate Repeat Infinity (out June 24 on Banko Gotiti Records), finds the artist connecting his love of both dance music and new wave pop, while subtly taking on queer political issues in his lyrics.

“This record is the summation of a years-long obsession with capitalism’s slow and frictional courtship of queerness: of the focus on marriage instead of healthcare, of erasure where remembrance is due, of an inflamed prejudice among the first let into the club,” Harwood told THUMP via email.

“Most of all I hope this album serves as a tribute to a generation of people who were left to die of a vicious plague and an indictment of their would-be heirs who choose to forget. Throughout, I imagine dance music as hallowed ground. The soundtrack and battle cry of a group of martyrs suffering for all the things I take for granted as an M4M in 2016.”

Stream the full EP below, preorder it on cassette or digitally here, and check out Harwood’s upcoming Canadian shows.

Scott Hardware Show Dates:

June 24 – The Velvet Underground – Toronto, ON (w/ Odonis Odonis & Prince Innocence)
July 7 – Incline/Decline Fest – Guelph, ON
July 28 – Bar Datcha – Montreal, QC
August 17 – Arboretum Fest – Ottawa, ON
August 20 – Camp Wavelength on Toronto Island – Toronto, ON
September 22 – Club Ballatou (POP Montreal) – Montreal, QC

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