New Club, Halcyon, Opens In San Francisco

Photo of Halcyon by Stephan Knight

A new venue called Halcyon opened in San Francisco earlier this month, which plans to also use its space for a nightclub as well as for weekly entertainment events like cabaret and dance classes. It is located in an industrial space on 314 11th Street in the South of Market (SoMa) neighborhood, and hosted its inaugural event on November 4 with sets from Israeli producer Guy J and Nottingham’s Dave Seamen.

The space is owned by veteran San Francisco restauranteur and nightclub operator Gina Milano, who previously worked at the the now-defunct Audio nightclub next door to the current Halcyon location.

Upcoming events at the club include a B2B set from dance music veterans Doc Martin and DJ Sneak this weekend, as well as imminent sets from Jan Blomqvist and Visionquest. On November 11, it hosted the first of a three-date Cocoon residency, marking the first ever in San Francisco.

A new 5,000-capacity London venue called Printworks was announced earlier today, and in NYC a new club called Schimanski recently opened in the former Verboten location.

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New Club, Halcyon, Opens In San Francisco

Photo of Halcyon by Stephan Knight

A new venue called Halcyon opened in San Francisco earlier this month, which plans to also use its space for a nightclub as well as for weekly entertainment events like cabaret and dance classes. It is located in an industrial space on 314 11th Street in the South of Market (SoMa) neighborhood, and hosted its inaugural event on November 4 with sets from Israeli producer Guy J and Nottingham’s Dave Seamen.

The space is owned by veteran San Francisco restauranteur and nightclub operator Gina Milano, who previously worked at the the now-defunct Audio nightclub next door to the current Halcyon location.

Upcoming events at the club include a B2B set from dance music veterans Doc Martin and DJ Sneak this weekend, as well as imminent sets from Jan Blomqvist and Visionquest. On November 11, it hosted the first of a three-date Cocoon residency, marking the first ever in San Francisco.

A new 5,000-capacity London venue called Printworks was announced earlier today, and in NYC a new club called Schimanski recently opened in the former Verboten location.

Follow Alexander on Twitter.

DJ Sneak Says He Doesn't Care About The Future Of Fabric Nightclub

Screenshot via YouTube.

DJ Sneak has made a reputation for his outspoken, occasionally offensive remarks. Now, he’s come under fire for his opinions regarding the future of Fabric nightclub, and he’s not apologizing for it. Fabric remains closed after its license was suspended and pending a police investigation of the deaths of two 18-year-old men.

British musician and producer Steve Mac captured a now-deleted Instagram post from DJ Sneak which included an image of the Fabric logo and #idon’tcare. “You can’t hide from your posts,” Mac wrote on his Facebook post of DJ Sneak’s Instagram image.

Never one afraid for confrontation, DJ Sneak has owned up to the post and called out the media outlets who’ve reported on it, too. He first took to his Twitter account to air his opinion. “All you weak ass online blah blah blah websites can go shuv it in your arse,” he wrote.

Since then, DJ Sneak has written a longer Facebook post addressing his haters. “Well guess what I still don’t care,” he began. “I will not apologize for any comments. If you don’t like my comments posts and opinions utilize your right to Unfriend Delete Block.”

Despite his opinion, many inside and outside of the nightlife industry have thrown their support for the nightclub. London Mayor Sadiq Khan has urged authorities to find a way to keep Fabric open and a Change.org petition now has more than 80,000 signatures.

DJ Sneak Says He Doesn't Care About The Future Of Fabric Nightclub

Screenshot via YouTube.

DJ Sneak has made a reputation for his outspoken, occasionally offensive remarks. Now, he’s come under fire for his opinions regarding the future of Fabric nightclub, and he’s not apologizing for it. Fabric remains closed after its license was suspended and pending a police investigation of the deaths of two 8-year-old men.

British musician and producer Steve Mac captured a now-deleted Instagram post from DJ Sneak which included an image of the Fabric logo and #idon’tcare. “You can’t hide from your posts,” Mac wrote on his Facebook post of DJ Sneak’s Instagram image.

Never one afraid for confrontation, DJ Sneak has owned up to the post and called out the media outlets who’ve reported on it, too. He first took to his Twitter account to air his opinion. “All you weak ass online blah blah blah websites can go shuv it in your arse,” he wrote.

Since then, DJ Sneak has written a longer Facebook post addressing his haters. “Well guess what I still don’t care,” he began. “I will not apologize for any comments. If you don’t like my comments posts and opinions utilize your right to Unfriend Delete Block.”

Despite his opinion, many inside and outside of the nightlife industry have thrown their support for the nightclub. London Mayor Sadiq Khan has urged authorities to find a way to keep Fabric open and a Change.org petition now has more than 80,000 signatures.

The Oral History Of The First Toronto Nightclub That Brought Gays, Straights, And Ravers Together

Industry crowd, photo by Idalina Leandro

When you talk to veterans of Toronto’s underground dance music circles, there are two historic venues that are regularly described as “legendary.” The first is the Twilight Zone, which effectively introduced house music to the city in the 1980s. The second is Industry, which operated from 1996 to 2000, and represented a turning point for Toronto after-hours nightlife.

Owned by Matt Casselman (aka DJ Matt C), Mario Jukica (aka DJ Mario J), Gavin “Gerbz” Bryan, and Daniel Bellavance, the King Street West space had the capacity for approximately 1,000 partiers, which provided the stability needed to start booking big name international DJs. While the superstars of the European circuit made appearances there, including Carl Cox, Daft Punk, and Roni Size, it was the club’s close links to the regional scenes of Chicago, Detroit, and New York that helped shape its identity.

Perhaps most importantly, it created an opportunity for the various fragmented scenes to finally come together, uniting the gay community, the house music crowd, and the ravers under one roof. THUMP spoke to some of the key players to help uncover the true story of Industry.

Matt Casselman, photo by Idalina Leandro

The Industry founders first met at Buzz, a Saturday night afterhours club, which would later became the infamous Comfort Zone. While many partiers from the era believed the move to the King Street West location was spurred by a 1996 shooting, the real reasons were less dramatic.

Matt Casselman The End happened to be in town, and was already coming to the party, so I hit him up and asked if he could jump in for an hour until Tenaglia got there. Tenaglia didn’t even get on until four in the morning on that last night, but no one seemed to give a shit. No one was going anywhere and he ended up playing until 7 PM that night.

All interviews conducted separately and edited for clarity.

Idalina Leandro is currently working on a documentary about Industry, see more of her work here.


Benjamin Boles is on
Twitter.

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DJ Sneak Talks Tough Off Twitter, Too

This week’s Rave Curious podcast features the house gangster himself, DJ Sneak. The Chicago icon has deep roots in the city’s house music culture, learning his craft both in the club and behind the counter at the city’s legendary Gramaphone Records. He has also become known in recent years as one of the outspoken DJs on Twitter, defending his old school ethics against the rise of EDM’s alternative set of musical values. He’s also occasionally tangled with peers like Seth Troxler over BBQ and other beef.

But outside the online hype, Sneak is purist when it comes to the art of DJing. “Even when I’m sleeping, I’m mixing in my head,” the 25-year veteran told Rave Curious. No wonder a new generation is getting turned on to his thumping, bumping, looping house sound. Learn what Sneak thinks about Beatport, beefing, and his endless supply of blunts on this episode of Rave Curious podcast.

Subscribe to the Rave Curious Podcast on iTunes or listen on Soundcloud, and get a new episode every other week, plus download past interviews with Adam Beyer, Chris Liebing, Danny Tenaglia, Radio Slave and more. While you’re at it, you can also follow Rave Curious on Facebook and Twitter.

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