Ontario To Open North America's Second Largest Pressing Plant

Image courtesy of Pixabay

A 20,000 square foot vinyl pressing plant, Precision Record Pressing Inc., will open in Burlington, Ontario this fall. The operation is a joint venture, co-presented by Canadian music distributor Isotope Music Inc. and Czech vinyl manufacturer GZ, a business that Bloomberg called the biggest vinyl manufacturer in the world in 2015, which currently fills orders for Universal, Sony Canada, and a number of independent labels.

Although the plant won’t be officially open until September, Precision will begin producing vinyl in the second week of August. Isotrope president Gerry McGhee told FYI Music News that phase one of production will yield 4.5 million records from the Burlington plant, along with 2 million from the Czech facility. Phase two will see the addition of five new automated presses featuring “heat control and a lot of safety features that weren’t in the old machines,” which will knock the unit production up to 11 million records and statically make the Burlington location the second largest plant in North America.

Despite the significant size of the operation, McGhee says that he wants to support independent labels, which is good news for those of us concerned by the way major labels to crowding smaller scale imprints out of pressing plants during the so-called “vinyl boom.” “We are more than happy to look at 200-300 unit runs,” he said. “We’re very aware of the independent market and the way they’ve been treated.”

According to the article, the company is also looking to expand: “We’ve already bought a plant in the US based in the Midwest and there’ll be a west coast plant so we’ll have three in North America,” explained McGhee.

At full capacity, the Burlington facility will be turn around orders in 6-8 weeks.

Recently, the BBC found that half the people who buy vinyl don’t actually listen to it. Meanwhile, Canadian company Viryl Technologies has developed a fully automated record press that could help modernize the vinyl industry.

Follow Alexander on Twitter.

Qween Beat's Byrell The Great Gives JX Cannon's "Gagged" A Mechanically Minimal Remix

Release art courtesy of the label

NYC imprint Sweat Equity boss, JX Cannon, has turned to Qween Beat-affiliated ballroom producer Byrell The Great for a mechanically minimal remix of “Gagged,” off of his forthcoming Tanked EP. Pairing back the hardcore-indebted bombast of the original, Byrell’s take is sleek, precisely calibrated, and luxuriant in its rhythmic striationbuilding power and a sense of aura more through careful arrangement than full-tilt overdrive.

“The first time I saw Byrell was in the basement of the now defunct Lit Lounge,” said JX Cannon to THUMP via email. “We’ve played together at parties like Bounce Gallery and Hot Action, and he always slays his sets. I was so excited he agreed to do a remix for the EP!”

Tanked/Gagged will be inaugurate Loveless Records‘ new sub-label Materia, available July 8 on Bandcamp and June 15 in stores.

Recently, JX Cannon got together with Fake Accent/Shottas founder Tygapaw for a scorching B2B ahead of NYC’s first Spice Ball. That wasn’t before he produced that viral Jersey club Obama remix though.

Follow Alexander on Twitter.

Negative Gemini Pares Down Her Sound With Airy Instrumental Track "Nu Hope"

Brooklyn artist Lindsey French, AKA Negative Gemini, is back after her last release with “Nu Hope,” another cut from her forthcoming Body Work album out August 12 on George Clanton’s 100% Electronica. The track is one of French’s first releases thus far to not include her vocals, and focuses more on her production chopsin this case a pairing of ethereal synths and some seriously deep basslines.

“‘Nu Hope’ is the first song on the second side of the album and the one I usually like to start my live sets with,” French told THUMP over email about the track. “There’s a lot of focus on the bass in this track, something I put a lot more emphasis on with this album overall than in my previous works. I like the different ways those lower frequencies can lead a song, and the way they can carry and fill a room. I wanted the sound to envelop the listener and to suggest a floating sensation.”

Check out the track below and head here for more info.

Aus Music Celebrates 100 Releases With A Retrospective Compilation You Can Stream In Full Right Here

We’ve been huge fans of Will Saul’s Aus imprint for years now, and with 100 top notch releases under their belt, that shouldn’t be surprising. Having played home to seminal record after seminal record, they’ve cemented their place in the pantheon of UK club culture. This month sees Saul’s label hit the 100 release mark, and they’ve decided to celebrate in style.

The ever evolving label has put together a comprehensive 24 track quadruple vinyl, triple CD and vast digital compilation, due for release 8th July Aus 100 features the likes of Bicep, Midland, Huxley, DJ T and Nick Hoppner so there’s something for everyone here. We’re beyond delighted to be bringing you an exclusive stream of the entire thing right here on THUMP.

We also caught up with Saul himself for a quick run down on how a label hits 100 releases without dropping a clanger. Tuck into it all below.

THUMP: Can you tell us a little about the genesis of Aus? What made you want to start an imprint in the first place? And how did you want it to stand out?

Will Saul: The label was founded as an outlet for Sideshow (Fink’s alter ego) and Lee Jones to release artist albums. I met Fink working at Sony nearly 15 years ago. I started out doing work experience there where I was basically “licking and sticking” (posting things) and making tea. I then progressed to being a junior product manager/A&R in Sony International. I started promoting my own little nights in London at the same time and Fin and I became good friends, we would DJ together at these parties and make music together in his studio. Back then he was signed to Ninja Tune as an artist, and I was running a label called Simple Records. Aus was initially an off-shoot of Simple. In German it means “off” and, as a bonus, it also sounds like house!

Aus started out as a pretty left-field label and this was why we started releasing early records by Ramadanman, Appleblim, Joy Orbison and Martyn. Their material was based in dubstep, and while it had a definite house and techno leaning, it was never considered as such. Aus has since developed into more of a house and techno label, and when that started to happen I decided to stop doing Simplethe labels were converging in sound.

I didn’t really want it to stand out as such. I just believed in the music that my friend was making and felt it should be released and that people would like it and hopefully buy it.. To be fair not may people actually bought the first records on either label but we got there in the end!

Do you look back on these 100 releases with an incredible sense of pride? Are they the musical equivalent of photos of a toddler puking into a paddling pool that you might see on Facebook?
Yeah, it’s a little bit like that. I have seen a fair few of the artists I’ve worked with over the years puke after a little too much from one thing or the other but thats a whole other story! I’m very surprised we’ve made it to releasing 100 records, that’s for sure, and I certainly had no plan or intention to ever get this far. Working with !k7 for the last two and half years has definitely enabled us to release much more music and reach the milestone far quicker than I would have been able to on my own. I am also very proud of each and every record that we’ve released.

If you HAD to single out a single release as the one you were most excited about releasing, which would it be and why?
It’s impossible to just pick one, but I guess we had a run of records of the space of a yearJoy Orbison (“The Shrew Would have Cushioned The Blow”), Ramadanman & Midland (“Your Words Matter”), Ramadanman & Appleblim (“Void 23 (Carl Craig Re-edit)”), SCB (“Loss”), George FitzGerald (“Child”), Midland (“Trace”), Leon Vynehall (“Brother”), and Dusky (“Careless”)that really built up momentum for us. Over that period we were the most charted record label on Resident Advisor and getting a lot of radio play and it seemed like we reached a lot of people.

Do you feel like Aus has changed the dance music landscape?
I don’t think so, no, and if we had we probably wouldn’t still be relevant today. In order to genuinely change the landscape of dance music you need to do one thing (and the first time it was done it was probably pretty special) over and over again until everyone wants a piece of it. People grow sick of that thing very quickly and you’re no longer relevant as you have rinsed said sound out. I’ve seen this on so many levels over the years. I try to work with artists that are all unique and have their own individual aesthetic so that the label never gets too heavily associated with one sound but hopefully gets associated with regularly releasing good records. Hopefully this approach has contributed to our longevity.

Will we see 100 more releases?
I can’t even begin to think about that but I still get the same buzz from releasing music I’m passionate about so why not!

Aus 100 is out on July 8th on, yep, Aus.


Lisbon Wunderkind Dotorado Pro Builds On Smash Hit "African Scream" With Enchufada EP

Release art courtesy of the label

Angola-born, Portugal-based beat maker Dotorado Pro has returned to Buraka Som Sistema‘s Enchufada imprint with a new EP of afro-house beats, Rei Das Marimbas (King of Marimbas). We’re delighted to be streaming the 18-year-old producer’s record in full here at THUMP, which does a fine job of living up to its title, serving up skipping, tensile polyrhythms interlaced with cyclical synths, and of course, those marimbas.

Dotorado Pro initially broke out in 2014 after making serious moves on Portuguese sales charts with the churningly insistent hit “African Scream,” making waves on dancefloors around the world and inspiring dance videos on YouTube from as many places.

The artist was kind enough to have a quick chat with THUMP via email, too, where we talked about the record’s production, how his African roots attract him to marimbas, and what young producers we should be on the look out for.

THUMP: What has the incredibly enthusiastic response to “African Scream” been like for you? Has its success affected your attitude towards making music?
Dotorado Pro: I’m very happy for the success of “African Scream”, I definitely wasn’t expecting it. This track opened a lot of doors for me and allowed me to show everyone my skills, and how much I love making music. It became the track that identifies my sound and I want to build on that and keep working. Until “African Scream” came out I was mostly making tracks and putting them up on SoundCloud just to have fun, but then it became clear that this could be something big, that I could have an audience.

What sorts of things were you thinking about or listening to when you made this EP? What characterized the production process for you?
I was mostly listening to my own tracks, especially “African Scream.” People know me from that track and I wanted to give them something in that style. The idea was basically to take that formula and expand on it, always with the marimbas my favorite instrumentas the main focus. That’s why I wanted to call the EP Rei das Marimbas (King of Marimbas).

Marimbas have featured on a ton of your tracks over the years. Why do you love the instrument so much?
It’s an instrument that immediately gives an African vibe to the track, and since my roots are in Africa I’m always looking for that. It also makes a track so lively, I can make any beat exciting with a marimba loop and the crowd loves it as well. It’s an instrument that I really can’t get out of my head, I love exploring all the different tones and patterns over an afro-house beat.

This is your second release for Buraka Som Sistema’s label. What has the experience of working with them been like?
I really like the opportunities I’ve had and the people I’ve met since I began working with Enchufada. It gave me the possibility to play my music in a lot of different stages and to bigger crowds. They help me a lot and we exchange a lot of ideas about music, it’s been a very good experience.

Who are some of your favorite young producers working right now?
There are a lot of new names coming up who are doing really great things. My younger brother is starting to do some really heavy beats with the name D’cantwo Junior, but I also love producers like Big Vado, DJ Teklas, DiZona Crew’s 2Pekes or Matabaya, the list goes on and on.

Follow Alexander on Twitter.

Palmistry Raises His Voice

All photos by Tonje Thilesen

Benjy Keating sounds rough today, though it’s not really his fault. The voice on the other end of an early June Skype call from Berlinwhere he’s stationed for a few months to work on new musicisn’t one that I recognize. The connection breaks up; every other word is cloaked in distortion. We hang up and call back, then eventually resign to speaking back and forth via chat. The unrelenting crackle of that call is the opposite to the smooth, softly Auto-Tune-coated lilt that I’m used to hearing on his records.

The London-based songwriter and producer has been working under the name Palmistry since 2011, slowly shaping and honing that wisp of a voice over punctured drums and lilting keyboard melodies. Early self-released collectionslike 2011’s Cut EPdemonstrated his singular, controlled talent, and attracted kindred spirits. Over the past five years, Keating has made beats for the mysterious, Hippos in Tanks-signed, Cantonese-rapping MC Triad God; released a 2014 EP on pointillist trance producer Lorenzo Senni’s Presto?! label; and fallen in with Brooklyn’s Mixpak crew, whose founder, Dre Skull, shares his taste for dancehall’s immortal riddims. While some writers have emphasized his music’s indebtedness to that Jamaican tradition, Keating has arguably been mining the pop idiom in equal measure since 2013, when he collaborated with pop provocateur SOPHIE on Palmistry’s first Mixpak single, “Catch.” The pairing made perfect sense, with SOPHIE’s manic bubblegum sensibilities meshing seamlessly with the slower bounce that had become a Keating hallmark.

Mixpak released his long-in-the-making debut album, Pagan, back in June. The years he’s taken to complete it have afforded him a approach that is unique even for that label’s vast roster of experimenters, weaving dancehall’s off-kilter rhythms, the low-key gleam of pop music, and trance’s head-spinning synth-work into a bed for his celestial voice. While that voice often manifested in a hushed whisper during his early work, his delivery is stronger, clearer and more nuanced than ever on Paganas if to underscore the fact that he’s revealing some of his most personal stories to date.

Keating was born in Kilkenny, Ireland, but he was raised in the churchmore specifically, a non-denominational congregation that his parents ran out of their own home. His mother was a worship leader who would play guitar and sing during services; his father was a preacher with a complicated past. After running away from a borstala sort of youth detention center and reform school in the U.K.at the age of 16, Keating’s dad had been in and out of prison until his late 20s, mostly due to drug-related charges. It was there that the elder Keating found Christianity. “” versions of his personal experience. Still, there’s a newfound confidence therethe sense that you’re catching a new glimpse of him with every word, whether he’s singing about his past or of pouring out another shot.

Some critics have have suggested Keating’s engagement with dancehall is problematic, an act of cultural appropriation from someone who isn’t Jamaican-born. However, Keating would say that his music isn’t a direct riff on the genreit’s slower, a little more somber. “I wouldn’t say I’m making dancehall, even though I’m on a dancehall-heavy label, and it’s definitely what I listen to most,” he tells me. Indeedwith their bright keyboard chords, elastic basslines, and wooden snareshis productions lean further towards pop, albeit a weirder and more soft-spoken brand of it than you hear on the radio. “My music is too underground to be called pop in the general sense, but I write it with an emphasis to be remembered,” he explains.

More than any one genre in particular, the sound he’s created feels most indebted to the animated rhythms of city life, to the melting pot culture of his adopted homes of London and Berlin. Currently, he’s been working on his second record as Palmistry, as well as a long-awaited second Triad God album, and some other “anonymous” projects he doesn’t want to talk about yet. While out in German capital, he says he’s been immersing himself in a whole new world of sounds, including those of the reggaeton-influenced Mobilegirl; 19-year-old wunderkind Mechatok, who meshes rap and club music as part of Stockholm’s STAYCORE crew; and WHY BE, whose hissing, apocalyptic productions have found their way onto Rabit’s Halcyon Veil label. “It’s the younger generation that I’m super excited by,” he tells me. Keating may be talking about his peers, but he’s speaking about a generation that includes him.

Palmistry’s debut album Pagan is out now on Mixpak.

Aurora Mitchell is on Twitter.

Correction: A previous version of this article incorrectly stated that Mechatok was part of Kamixlo, Uli K, and Endgame’s Bala Club crew, when in fact, he is part of Stockholm’s STAYCORE collective. The article has been updated accordingly.

Did A Reddit User Just Uncover A New Justice Track?

Photo courtesy of the artists

The latest development in Justice’s long-overdue comeback has given fans cause to D.A.N.C.E in celebration. Nine years on from the release of their debut album, Cross, and five from their last release, Audio, Video, Disco, a new song seems to have emerged from the iconic French duo, thanks to the handy sleuthing work of one Shazam-wielding Redditor.

The latest chapter in Justice’s slow-burning saga began inconspicuously last month with what was otherwise an ordinary DJ set at Barcelona’s Snar Festival by Busy P, Boston Bun, and Para One of French label and collective Ed Banger (also home to Justice). The first track of the two-hour set, an unidentified dreamy, space disco groover, caught the attention of outlets such as The French Shuffle, which speculated that the duo might be behind it, despite the sound being quite removed from their typical jagged electro.

Once the article made it to Reddit, user Ronny_t37 put the track to song-identifying app Shazam (via iPhone’s Siri), which pulled up a track called “Safe And Sound” by one Justice. THUMP has reached out to Justice’s publicist for confirmation of the track and is awaiting a response.

Justice’s return has been unfolding at a drip-feed pace. Ed Banger boss Busy P first hinted at a new album from the duo of Xavier de Rosnay and Gaspard Aug back in 2013 during a Reddit AMA, and then confirmed in 2015 that it was indeed on the way. Last year, they also came out of hiding for a select handful of appearances, including a guest mix on NTS Radio, a DJ set at London’s XOYO, and a NYE performance in New York. In April, their label, Because Music, posted a photo on Twitter of them signing paperwork.

Watch Ed Banger at Snar below and hope that more Justice music surfaces sooner rather than later.

Aus Music Celebrates 100 Releases With A Retrospective Compilation You Can Stream In Full Right Here

We’ve been huge fans of Will Saul’s Aus imprint for years now, and with 100 top notch releases under their belt, that shouldn’t be surprising. Having played home to seminal record after seminal record, they’ve cemented their place in the pantheon of UK club culture. This month sees Saul’s label hit the 100 release mark, and they’ve decided to celebrate in style.

The ever evolving label has put together a comprehensive 24 track quadruple vinyl, triple CD and vast digital compilation, due for release 8th July Aus 100 features the likes of Bicep, Midland, Huxley, DJ T and Nick Hoppner so there’s something for everyone here. We’re beyond delighted to be bringing you an exclusive stream of the entire thing right here on THUMP.

We also caught up with Saul himself for a quick run down on how a label hits 100 releases without dropping a clanger. Tuck into it all below.

THUMP: Can you tell us a little about the genesis of Aus? What made you want to start an imprint in the first place? And how did you want it to stand out?

Will Saul: The label was founded as an outlet for Sideshow (Fink’s alter ego) and Lee Jones to release artist albums. I met Fink working at Sony nearly 15 years ago. I started out doing work experience there where I was basically “licking and sticking” (posting things) and making tea. I then progressed to being a junior product manager/A&R in Sony International. I started promoting my own little nights in London at the same time and Fin and I became good friends, we would DJ together at these parties and make music together in his studio. Back then he was signed to Ninja Tune as an artist, and I was running a label called Simple Records. Aus was initially an off-shoot of Simple. In German it means “off” and, as a bonus, it also sounds like house!

Aus started out as a pretty left-field label and this was why we started releasing early records by Ramadanman, Appleblim, Joy Orbison and Martyn. Their material was based in dubstep, and while it had a definite house and techno leaning, it was never considered as such. Aus has since developed into more of a house and techno label, and when that started to happen I decided to stop doing Simplethe labels were converging in sound.

I didn’t really want it to stand out as such. I just believed in the music that my friend was making and felt it should be released and that people would like it and hopefully buy it.. To be fair not may people actually bought the first records on either label but we got there in the end!

Do you look back on these 100 releases with an incredible sense of pride? Are they the musical equivalent of photos of a toddler puking into a paddling pool that you might see on Facebook?
Yeah, it’s a little bit like that. I have seen a fair few of the artists I’ve worked with over the years puke after a little too much from one thing or the other but thats a whole other story! I’m very surprised we’ve made it to releasing 100 records, that’s for sure, and I certainly had no plan or intention to ever get this far. Working with !k7 for the last two and half years has definitely enabled us to release much more music and reach the milestone far quicker than I would have been able to on my own. I am also very proud of each and every record that we’ve released.

If you HAD to single out a single release as the one you were most excited about releasing, which would it be and why?
It’s impossible to just pick one, but I guess we had a run of records of the space of a yearJoy Orbison (“The Shrew Would have Cushioned The Blow”), Ramadanman & Midland (“Your Words Matter”), Ramadanman & Appleblim (“Void 23 (Carl Craig Re-edit)”), SCB (“Loss”), George FitzGerald (“Child”), Midland (“Trace”), Leon Vynehall (“Brother”), and Dusky (“Careless”)that really built up momentum for us. Over that period we were the most charted record label on Resident Advisor and getting a lot of radio play and it seemed like we reached a lot of people.

Do you feel like Aus has changed the dance music landscape?
I don’t think so, no, and if we had we probably wouldn’t still be relevant today. In order to genuinely change the landscape of dance music you need to do one thing (and the first time it was done it was probably pretty special) over and over again until everyone wants a piece of it. People grow sick of that thing very quickly and you’re no longer relevant as you have rinsed said sound out. I’ve seen this on so many levels over the years. I try to work with artists that are all unique and have their own individual aesthetic so that the label never gets too heavily associated with one sound but hopefully gets associated with regularly releasing good records. Hopefully this approach has contributed to our longevity.

Will we see 100 more releases?
I can’t even begin to think about that but I still get the same buzz from releasing music I’m passionate about so why not!

Aus 100 is out on July 8th on, yep, Aus.


Lisbon Wunderkind Dotorado Pro Builds On Smash Hit "African Scream" With Enchufada EP

Release art courtesy of the label

Angola-born, Portugal-based beat maker Dotorado Pro has returned to Buraka Som Sistema‘s Enchufada imprint with a new EP of afro-house beats, Rei Das Marimbas (King of Marimbas). We’re delighted to be streaming the 18-year-old producer’s record in full here at THUMP, which does a fine job of living up to its title, serving up skipping, tensile polyrhythms interlaced with cyclical synths, and of course, those marimbas.

Dotorado Pro initially broke out in 2014 after making serious moves on Portuguese sales charts with the churningly insistent hit “African Scream,” making waves on dancefloors around the world and inspiring dance videos on YouTube from as many places.

The artist was kind enough to have a quick chat with THUMP via email, too, where we talked about the record’s production, how his African roots attract him to marimbas, and what young producers we should be on the look out for.

THUMP: What has the incredibly enthusiastic response to “African Scream” been like for you? Has its success affected your attitude towards making music?
Dotorado Pro: I’m very happy for the success of “African Scream”, I definitely wasn’t expecting it. This track opened a lot of doors for me and allowed me to show everyone my skills, and how much I love making music. It became the track that identifies my sound and I want to build on that and keep working. Until “African Scream” came out I was mostly making tracks and putting them up on SoundCloud just to have fun, but then it became clear that this could be something big, that I could have an audience.

What sorts of things were you thinking about or listening to when you made this EP? What characterized the production process for you?
I was mostly listening to my own tracks, especially “African Scream.” People know me from that track and I wanted to give them something in that style. The idea was basically to take that formula and expand on it, always with the marimbas my favorite instrumentas the main focus. That’s why I wanted to call the EP Rei das Marimbas (King of Marimbas).

Marimbas have featured on a ton of your tracks over the years. Why do you love the instrument so much?
It’s an instrument that immediately gives an African vibe to the track, and since my roots are in Africa I’m always looking for that. It also makes a track so lively, I can make any beat exciting with a marimba loop and the crowd loves it as well. It’s an instrument that I really can’t get out of my head, I love exploring all the different tones and patterns over an afro-house beat.

This is your second release for Buraka Som Sistema’s label. What has the experience of working with them been like?
I really like the opportunities I’ve had and the people I’ve met since I began working with Enchufada. It gave me the possibility to play my music in a lot of different stages and to bigger crowds. They help me a lot and we exchange a lot of ideas about music, it’s been a very good experience.

Who are some of your favorite young producers working right now?
There are a lot of new names coming up who are doing really great things. My younger brother is starting to do some really heavy beats with the name D’cantwo Junior, but I also love producers like Big Vado, DJ Teklas, DiZona Crew’s 2Pekes or Matabaya, the list goes on and on.

Follow Alexander on Twitter.

Palmistry Raises His Voice

All photos by Tonje Thilesen

Benjy Keating sounds rough today, though it’s not really his fault. The voice on the other end of an early June Skype call from Berlinwhere he’s stationed for a few months to work on new musicisn’t one that I recognize. The connection breaks up; every other word is cloaked in distortion. We hang up and call back, then eventually resign to speaking back and forth via chat. The unrelenting crackle of that call is the opposite to the smooth, softly Auto-Tune-coated lilt that I’m used to hearing on his records.

The London-based songwriter and producer has been working under the name Palmistry since 2011, slowly shaping and honing that wisp of a voice over punctured drums and lilting keyboard melodies. Early self-released collectionslike 2011’s Cut EPdemonstrated his singular, controlled talent, and attracted kindred spirits. Over the past five years, Keating has made beats for the mysterious, Hippos in Tanks-signed, Cantonese-rapping MC Triad God; released a 2014 EP on pointillist trance producer Lorenzo Senni’s Presto?! label; and fallen in with Brooklyn’s Mixpak crew, whose founder, Dre Skull, shares his taste for dancehall’s immortal riddims. While some writers have emphasized his music’s indebtedness to that Jamaican tradition, Keating has arguably been mining the pop idiom in equal measure since 2013, when he collaborated with pop provocateur SOPHIE on Palmistry’s first Mixpak single, “Catch.” The pairing made perfect sense, with SOPHIE’s manic bubblegum sensibilities meshing seamlessly with the slower bounce that had become a Keating hallmark.

Mixpak released his long-in-the-making debut album, Pagan, back in June. The years he’s taken to complete it have afforded him a approach that is unique even for that label’s vast roster of experimenters, weaving dancehall’s off-kilter rhythms, the low-key gleam of pop music, and trance’s head-spinning synth-work into a bed for his celestial voice. While that voice often manifested in a hushed whisper during his early work, his delivery is stronger, clearer and more nuanced than ever on Paganas if to underscore the fact that he’s revealing some of his most personal stories to date.

Keating was born in Kilkenny, Ireland, but he was raised in the churchmore specifically, a non-denominational congregation that his parents ran out of their own home. His mother was a worship leader who would play guitar and sing during services; his father was a preacher with a complicated past. After running away from a borstala sort of youth detention center and reform school in the U.K.at the age of 16, Keating’s dad had been in and out of prison until his late 20s, mostly due to drug-related charges. It was there that the elder Keating found Christianity. “” versions of his personal experience. Still, there’s a newfound confidence therethe sense that you’re catching a new glimpse of him with every word, whether he’s singing about his past or of pouring out another shot.

Some critics have have suggested Keating’s engagement with dancehall is problematic, an act of cultural appropriation from someone who isn’t Jamaican-born. However, Keating would say that his music isn’t a direct riff on the genreit’s slower, a little more somber. “I wouldn’t say I’m making dancehall, even though I’m on a dancehall-heavy label, and it’s definitely what I listen to most,” he tells me. Indeedwith their bright keyboard chords, elastic basslines, and wooden snareshis productions lean further towards pop, albeit a weirder and more soft-spoken brand of it than you hear on the radio. “My music is too underground to be called pop in the general sense, but I write it with an emphasis to be remembered,” he explains.

More than any one genre in particular, the sound he’s created feels most indebted to the animated rhythms of city life, to the melting pot culture of his adopted homes of London and Berlin. Currently, he’s been working on his second record as Palmistry, as well as a long-awaited second Triad God album, and some other “anonymous” projects he doesn’t want to talk about yet. While out in German capital, he says he’s been immersing himself in a whole new world of sounds, including those of the reggaeton-influenced Mobilegirl; 19-year-old Bala Club crew wunderkind Mechatok, who meshes rap and club music with simmering snares and touching melodies; and WHY BE, whose hissing, apocalyptic productions have found their way onto Rabit’s Halcyon Veil label. “It’s the younger generation that I’m super excited by,” he tells me. Keating may be talking about his peers, but he’s speaking about a generation that includes him.

Palmistry’s debut album Pagan is out now on Mixpak.

Aurora Mitchell is on Twitter.

The Avalanches' New Album, 'Wildflower,' Is Streaming One Week Early

‘Wildflower’ album cover from The Avalanches.

Wildflower, The Avalanches’ highly-anticipated second album, just dropped a week early for streaming on Apple Music. The hour-long, 22-track album was previously set to drop July 8 on Astralwerks. It has been 16 years since the group released Since I Left You, their critically-acclaimed debut.

Wildflower is a sonically-dense record featuring the group’s signature throwback soul samples and unique field recordings. Unlike their debut, Wildflower includes a number of guest appearances from musicians including Danny Brown, MF DOOM, Toro y Moi, Jennifer Herrema of Royal Trux, Biz Markie, and Father John Misty. Stream Wildflower below.

Watch the video for “Frankie Sinatra,” their first single from Wildflower, featuring Danny Brown and MF DOOM. In June, we spoke with the now-grown up 12-year-old the group sampled on their new single, “Subways.”

Sven Vath Responds To Getting Caught Watching Soccer During His Set

Photo from Wikimedia Commons

German techno DJ and producer Sven Vath was caught watching a European soccer championship game on his phone during his DJ set at the Awakenings Festival in the Netherlands last weekend. On Wednesday, the Facebook page Mr. After Party posted an image of Vath during his set with a closeup of the soccer match on his phone and the caption, “Talk about priorities…”

Vath today responded by posting on his own Facebook page a photo of him DJing, with the caption: “This Saturday I am playing at Love Family Park and during my set, you will be able to see the scores of the Germany-Italy game on the screens for the first half.” Not only will fans get to see the score of the Germany-France game on the screens during the first half of his performance at Love Family Park, Vath promised that they’ll also get to, “watch the rest of the game together.”